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Is there a simple way to "rewind" /dev/stdin inside my bash script which already read all or some portion from the input pipe?

Application: I wrote a simple MDA that in part 1, reads a single email from fetchmail line by line, like so:

while read -a linA; do
    echo -e "$[++linenum]:\t${#linA[@]},${linA[*]}" > /dev/null  # verbose
    [ "${linA[0]}" = "Date:" ] && unset linA[0] && mailDate="${linA[*]}"
    [ "${linA[0]}" = "Subject:" ] && unset linA[0] && mailSubject="${linA[*]}"
    [ "$mailSubject" = "Courtesy Fill Notification" ] || break  # if wrong subject then thank you, we're done with this mail
done

and at the end of processing, I wish to save the entire message into a file, both for debugging, and so that the writer-side of the pipe sees that its entire output had been read, and not return failure (therefore keeping the message as unread in the mailbox).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Reading a pipe is destructive; there is no way to seek on a pipe:

ESPIPE (29): Illegal seek

The error number is from MacOS X, but the name is traditional (and POSIX-mandated) and gives an indication of where the restriction comes from.

So, if you want to reprocess input in a shell script, you will need to stash the standard input away in a file so you can reprocess it:

tmp=${TMPDIR:-/tmp}/xx.$$    # Consider mktemp or something
trap "rm -f $tmp.1; exit 1" 0 1 2 3 13 15  # Exit, HUP, INT, QUIT, PIPE, TERM

tee $tmp.1 |
while read -a linA
do
    ...
done

...reprocess $tmp.1 here...

rm -f $tmp.1
trap 0
exit $exit_status

The only trap to watch is that because of the pipeline, variables set in the while loop are not accessible in the parent shell. If that's a problem, you can use:

tee $tmp.1 |
{
while read -a linA
do
    ...
done

...reprocess $tmp.1 here...
}

The braces group the statements for I/O redirection purposes. The tee process will have completed because of EOF so the file will be complete when the while read detects EOF, so it is safe to access $tmp.1 after the loop.

The one thing to watch is that tee will make this unresponsive to terminal input. Files won't be a problem; piped input is unlikely to be a problem. However, tee will probably fully buffer its output, rather than line buffering its output, so the read loop may not see anything until you've typed many lines of input.

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++ because I like your bash tricks in the first three code lines. My mda.sh script is always used non-interactively anyway...even for testing I redirect/cat a test file to it. –  Marcos Feb 16 '12 at 15:38
    
Out of curiosity, what code did you attempt to seek with to get that ESPIPE error? I may use for non-pipe cases. –  Marcos Feb 16 '12 at 16:12
1  
I actually ran a program I wrote/generated called errno that prints the information corresponding to an error number specified numerically or as a string (I specified ESPIPE). You would get it if you do: int p[2], e; pipe(p); lseek(p[0], -1L, 2); e = errno; printf("%d (%s)\n", e, strerror(e));, except the symbolic name is harder to get than that. (I have a Perl script to generate the actual code of errno.) –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 16 '12 at 16:38
    
Okay so you did that in C. No wonder I couldn't find any mention of seek or input buffer/stream cursor in man bash –  Marcos Feb 16 '12 at 17:45
1  
Sounds like the sane part of you may be doing the reconsidering :D Or the 'will be sane after fixing this insanity' part of you. Consider breaking it up into two separate scripts, too; a small one that decides on the temporary file name and then runs: tee $tmp.1 | new-script $tmp.1 (passing the new script the tee'd file name). Or, instead of all this, simply change the script to do: cat >$tmp.1 (instead of tee $tmp.1 | ...). Then redirect the primary input loop (while read ...) from $tmp.1. Since there is no pipeline, the should be no problems that weren't there before. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 17 '12 at 23:52

Not really, no.

You'll just have to append each line into a variable as you read it and clear the variable as needed.

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except often the loop exits early from a break –  Marcos Feb 16 '12 at 15:40

how about:

tmpfile=$(mktemp)
while read -a linA; do
  echo -e "$[++linenum]:\t${#linA[@]},${linA[*]}" > /dev/null  # verbose
  [ "${linA[0]}" = "Date:" ] && unset linA[0] && mailDate="${linA[*]}"
  echo "${linA}">>$tmpfile
done
mv $tmpfile fulltext.txt

I think it's better way because you read message just once

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Thanks. Because I intend to keep the input into a file anyway, I think I will skip this whole tmpfilename business and (over)write a fixed filename at the start, rather than end, of my script. Would need to slightly change my loop for that. So I think I might go with something like cat /dev/stdin > $inputfile followed by cat $inputfile | while read -a ... –  Marcos Feb 16 '12 at 16:24

Try exec < /dev/stdin which might work under Linux.

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