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I am wondering can try..catch force execution to go into the catch and run code in there?

here example code:

try {
    if (AnyConditionTrue) {
      // run some code
    }
    else {
      // go catch
    }
} catch (Exception) {
    // run some code here...
}
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7  
Exceptions are for handling exceptional behavior. They are not meant for control flow. –  Yuck Feb 16 '12 at 13:48
    
You mean like raising an exception in the else statement? Sure. It isn't the best way of designing your application but it is possible. Just do a Throw new Exception("This is a simple exception"); –  BiggsTRC Feb 16 '12 at 13:48
1  
throw new Exception("Some Message") –  L.B Feb 16 '12 at 13:49
2  
You could throw an exception in your else, but you should not use exceptions for control flow. –  cadrell0 Feb 16 '12 at 13:49
1  
It seems unlikely that this would be the right solution to any problem. Could you post some more details on what you are trying to do? –  alun Feb 16 '12 at 13:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Rather than throwing an Exception in the else, I would recommend extracting the code from your catch into a method and call that from your else

try
{
    if (AnyConditionTrue)
    {
        MethodWhenTrue();
    }
    else
    {
        HandleError();
    }
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    HandleError();
}
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   try{
      if (AnyConditionTrue){
              //run some code
               }
      else{
              throw new Exception();
          }
   }
   catch(){

      //run some code here...

   }

But like Yuck has stated, I wouldn't recommend this. You should take a step back at your design and what you're looking to accomplish. There's a better way to do it (i.e. with normal conditional flow, instead of exception handling).

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+1 As it does answer the question on how you would go about doing it. For control flow this is bad practice, as you've mentioned. It's rare that you'd need to throw an exception to be caught by the same try..catch construct. –  Yuck Feb 16 '12 at 13:52

Yes, you have to throw exception :

  try
  {
    throw new Exception("hello");
  }
  catch (Exception)
  {

     //run some code here...
  }
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Whilst this isn't technically the best way to do what the OP needs to do, it IS the simple solution to the question asked by the OP. –  Phill Healey Dec 11 '13 at 10:22

Yes, if you throw the exception that you intend to catch from within the try, it will be caught in the catch section.

I have to ask you why you would want to do this though? Exception handling is not meant to be a substitute for control flow.

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I think what you want is a finally block: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zwc8s4fz(v=vs.80).aspx

see this

try
 {
     doSomething();
 }
catch
 {
     catchSomething();
     throw an error
 } 
finally
 {
     alwaysDoThis();
 }

This is different if/when you do this:

try
 {
     doSomething(); 
 }
 catch
 {
     catchSomething(); 
     throw an error
 }
  alwaysDoThis();// will not run on error (in the catch) condition

the the this last instance, if an error occurs, the catch will execute but NOT the alwaysDoThis();. Of course you can still have multiple catch as always.

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The question wants to the code to run only if AnyConditionTrue is false or an exception is thrown. A finally will run even if AnyConditionTrue is true and no exception is thrown. You could add an if to check for AnyConditionTrue false, but that will not satisfy AnyConditionTrue is true and an exception is thrown. –  cadrell0 Feb 16 '12 at 13:56
    
I course if you pull the plug on the power, you have an unknown state of execution. –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 16 '12 at 14:02
    
@cadrell0 - yes, understood, just adding this example in case that resolves the issue - which is to NOT do flow control in this manner but DO it in the manner described IF it is TRULY an error condition and not simply flow control this may be appropriate. –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 16 '12 at 14:05
6  
I don't understand the difference you're trying to show here. Those two blocks of code do the same thing. Why do you think that in the second example the alwaysDoThis will not run if an exception is caught? –  Eric Lippert Feb 16 '12 at 15:35
    
I probably should have been more precise - what I mean here is that if you throw an error in the catch block, the condition exists where in the second example the statement does not run. Adding more precise code :) –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 16 '12 at 21:48

You could throw an exception to force a catch

throw new Exception(...);
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why are you catching an exception? Why not just run the code in your "else" block? If you MUST do it that way, just throw a new exception

throw new Exception();
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