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I am refactoring a large programm which does inter-process communication via wcf. Since the client has direct access to the service-interface a channelfactory is used to create channels, so that no extra client-service-stubs are needed. Communication consists of many big messages that are requested with high-frequency (NetTcpBinding is currently used, I am considering a switch to NetNamedPipeBinding).

My question is about the difference between creating/closing the channel vs. creating/closing the channelfactory. To be more precise: The channelfactory creates a channel. Now, in relation to an individual request: Should I create and close the channelfactory and with this also the channel in relation to an individual request (see solution no. 2) or is it more secure/better in terms of performance to only create/close the channel in relation to an individual request and leave the channelfactory open for multiple requests (see solution no. 1).

1)

//set up the channel factory right when I start the whole applicaton
ChannelFactory<IMyService> cf = new ChannelFactory<IMyService>();

//call this trillion of times over time period of hours whenever I want to make a request to the service; channel factory stays open for the whole time
try
{
    IMyService myService = cf.CreateChannel();
    var returnedStuff = myService.DoStuff();
    ((IClientChannel)myService).Close();
}
catch ...

//close the channel factory when I stop the whole application
cf.Close();

2)

//call this trillion of times over time period of hours whenever I want to make a request to the service
try
{
    ChannelFactory<IMyService> cf = new ChannelFactory<IMyService>();
    IMyService myService = cf.CreateChannel();
    var returnedStuff = myService.DoStuff();
    cf.Close();
}
catch ...

What are the pratical differences? What is the right way to do it? Are there even better alternatives?

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what binding are you using to talk to the service? –  Richard Blewett Feb 16 '12 at 14:18
    
ChannelFactory<T> implements IDisposable, its cleanup should be handled by a using statement. –  M.Babcock Feb 16 '12 at 14:21
    
currently nettcp is used as binding. I am thinking about switching to namedpipes but considering the current architecture this would be a major change. –  user1182735 Feb 16 '12 at 14:28
1  
I am using the try-catch pattern with close/abort. I have read that is recommended for wcf instead of the using-statement, since the call to close can cause an exception. There are several threads on stackoverflow about this. But my question is about the difference of closing the channel in comparision to the channelfactory. So it is about what to close when, not about how to close. I corrected my initial question so that it becomes a hopefully more clear. –  user1182735 Feb 16 '12 at 14:30
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Creating a channel factory can take up to 70ms (In the application I'm working on). Creating channels (from an existing channel factory is relatively fast in comparison). If your client usually communicates with the host using the same credentials, you should consider caching a channelfactory for each service interface that is consumed. You will see significant performance improvements if you do this. In your question, this would more closely relate to the second option you described.

Darin Damitrov did an interesting post on this here:-

creating WCF ChannelFactory<T>

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According to http://www.danrigsby.com/blog/index.php/2008/02/26/dont-wrap-wcf-service-hosts-or-clients-in-a-using-statement/

the way you should do this is:

ChannelFactory<IMyService> channelFactory = null;
try
{
    channelFactory =
        new ChannelFactory<IMyService>();
    channelFactory.Open();

    // Do work...

    channelFactory.Close();
}
catch (CommunicationException)
{
    if (channelFactory != null)
    {
        channelFactory.Abort();
    }
}
catch (TimeoutException)
{
    if (channelFactory != null)
    {
        channelFactory.Abort();
    }
}
catch (Exception)
{
    if (channelFactory != null)
    {
        channelFactory.Abort();
    }
    throw;
}

The main reasoning behind this is if you call Dispose() on ChannelFactory that in turn calls Close(), which can throw an exception if the underlying Channel is in the aborted state.

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Yes, this is about using-statement vs. try and catch. But my question is about the difference between closing the channel vs. closing the channelfactory. To be more precise: The channelfactory creates a channel. Now I have two things that can be closed: the channel and the channelfactory. In relation to an individual request: Should I close the channelfactory and with this also the channel after each individual request or is it better/more secure/better in terms of performance to only close the channel and leave the channelfactory open. –  user1182735 Feb 16 '12 at 18:07
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Not a direkt answer to my original question, but I have seen that there is static CreateChannel-method on ChannelFactory that one can use to createchannels. I now use this method to create the channels and, as a result, I don't have to deal with a channelfactory instance anymore. Therefore, I create the clientchannel before every request with the static factorymethod and close it (the channel) afterwards.

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