Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Many articles I've read on the Net about Singleton design pattern mention that the class should override 'clone()' method and in it, throw 'CloneNotSupported' exception. Is this really necessary?

The clone() method by default is protected, so no class (except those in the same package) would be able to call it on that Singleton instance. Plus, if this Singleton does not implement Cloneable, then even if this method is called, it will give a runtime exception. Plus, the constructor being private, we won't be able to subclass it and thus allow for its cloning. So should I still implement this advice for my Singleton classes?

EDIT: Just to clarify: I'm not looking for the best possible way to implement Singleton. I'm just asking about the validity of the advice mentioned above, w.r.t the 'normal' Singleton pattern (and not Enum based Singleton).

share|improve this question
2  
You're asking "If I'm creating singletons the wrong way, which I shouldn't be doing, should I be worried about X". The answer is do it the correct way which makes your question moot. No, you don't have to worry about this. –  Brian Roach Feb 16 '12 at 14:47
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you're really going to implement a singleton, use a one-element enum and stop thinking about it.


EDIT: Just to clarify: I'm not looking for the best possible way to implement Singleton. I'm just asking about the validity of the advice mentioned above, w.r.t the 'normal' Singleton pattern (and not Enum based Singleton).

Since you have Effective Java, then you should already be aware of the pitfalls and problems with Cloneable. That said, if you're going to implement a singleton one of the "wrong" ways, no, there's absolutely no reason whatsoever to implement Cloneable and override Object#clone() just to throw CloneNotSupportedException. Object#clone() already does this when the Cloneable interface is absent.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - And buy Josh Bloch's excellent Effective Java which covers that and more. –  Brian Roach Feb 16 '12 at 14:35
    
Yes, I know about it and have the book. But my question is about the cloning advice given in such articles. Are there any cases where this advice makes sense? –  shrini1000 Feb 16 '12 at 14:36
    
Since you can't clone an enum, no. –  Brian Roach Feb 16 '12 at 14:38
    
@shrini1000 why would you heed advice about an irrelevant implementation? –  Matt Ball Feb 16 '12 at 14:38
1  
@MДΓΓ БДLL I'm just trying to figure out the thought process behind giving such advice, and if there are any cases where this advice would make sense. –  shrini1000 Feb 16 '12 at 14:40
add comment

@shrini1000, You have a valid question but the suggetsion about clone is very specific to following condition

public Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException { throw new CloneNotSupportedException(); }

The above is only necessary if a superclass of a singleton class implements a public clone() method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx Gourabp; but I've seen many examples where the Singleton was not a sub class and yet it was explicitly preventing cloning, hence my question. –  shrini1000 Aug 7 '13 at 17:00
add comment

See http://stackoverflow.com/a/71399/385478 for the safest way to enforce the Singleton pattern. Essentially, make your Singleton an enum rather than a class, with a single INSTANCE value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

When writing a class using the Singleton pattern, only one instance of that class can exist at a time. As a result, the class must not be allowed to make a clone.

The singleton pattern says that only one instance of the class exist inside the program, so it is right to raise CloneNotSupportedException in the Clone() method.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you create a singleton the correct way in java using an enum, this isn't an issue. –  Brian Roach Feb 16 '12 at 14:40
1  
Wow, what an age where hacking a singleton out of an enum is considered the right way to do things. –  Perception Feb 16 '12 at 15:09
add comment

It is necessary if your Singleton class extends a class that has a visible clone() method defined in its hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to override the clone() method only if your singleton class implements Cloneable interface or a class which implements Cloneable interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can avoid cloning by giving already created object by clone method.

public Object clone() {

return singletoneObject;

}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.