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I'm writing a script at the moment and at one point, the scripts has to verify if one predefined IP is present in a big array of IPs. At this point, I would code that function like this (saying that "ips" is my array of IP and "ip" is the predefined ip)

ips.each do |existsip|
  if ip == existsip
      puts "ip exists"
      return 1
    end
  end
puts "ip doesn't exist"
return nil

But now my question is : Is there a faster way to do the same thing?

My solution doesn't seem to be really fast :(

Edit : I might have wrongly expressed myself. I can do array.include? but what I'd like to know is : Is array.include? the method that will give me the fastest result?

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1  
Use a Hash or Set instead of an array –  Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 15:28
    
Read ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Enumerable.html before any Ruby programming. –  tokland Feb 16 '12 at 15:30
    
You can use the include? method defined in class Array to make this operation look neater, I am not sure if it will increase the speed of the lookup much –  Hunter McMillen Feb 16 '12 at 15:30
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6140554/… –  Joseph Le Brech Feb 16 '12 at 15:31
    
@JosephLeBrech The question here is about searching an array. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 16 '12 at 15:38
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5 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can use Set. It is implemented on top of Hash and will be faster for big datasets - O(1).

require 'set'
s = Set.new ['1.1.1.1', '1.2.3.4']
# => #<Set: {"1.1.1.1", "1.2.3.4"}> 
s.include? '1.1.1.1'
# => true 
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1  
Or in your case: s = Set.new(ips) –  Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 15:32
    
Hello again Alex :) .include method source code seems to do almost the same thing as mine. Or is it actually faster? –  Cocotton Feb 16 '12 at 15:36
2  
@Cocotton: Much faster. You could also use a Hash with ip's as keys and 'true' as values. –  steenslag Feb 16 '12 at 15:49
    
@steenslag,Phrogz : For now I'll leave it like this (.include), but when I'll be done will my script, I'll switch it for a hash –  Cocotton Feb 16 '12 at 15:53
3  
For an array of 12.4 million short strings: a=('a'..'zzzzz').to_a; time{ a.include?('0') } #=> 0.71s; time{ Set.new(a) } #=> 11.2s; so yes, the overhead of creating the set needs to be worth the performance gains of instantaneous queries. –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 19:49
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A faster way would be:

if ips.include?(ip)
  puts "ip exists"
  return 1
else
  puts "ip doesn't exist"
  return nil
end
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Slightly faster, since the each occurs in C instead of Ruby, but it's still O(n) versus O(1) for a Hash or Set. –  Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 15:33
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You could use the Array#include method to return you a true/false.

http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Array.html#method-i-include-3F

if ips.include?(ip) #=> true
  puts 'ip exists'
else
  puts 'ip  doesn\'t exist'
end
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have you tried the Array#include? function?

http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Array.html#method-i-include-3F

You can see from the source it does almost exactly the same thing, except natively.

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This is still an O(n) time operation, as it must search through every item in the array (even if it's in C). –  Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 15:33
    
I know that an enum can be sorted, but I don't know how to search such a sorted array. One could make an indexed database column to do the job. –  Peter Ehrlich Feb 16 '12 at 17:54
1  
Even a binary search is O(log n). Hashing an item and looking it up in a hash table is a constant-time operation that is unrelated to the number of items stored. –  Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 22:04
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ips = ['10.10.10.10','10.10.10.11','10.10.10.12']

ip = '10.10.10.10'
ips.include?(ip) => true

ip = '10.10.10.13'
ips.include?(ip) => false

check Documentaion here

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But is this actually faster than my method? Because the source code of this seems to do practically the same thing as mine. –  Cocotton Feb 16 '12 at 15:36
    
ofcourse it is faster.. i have using in my project.. moreover when there is a method in ruby, why should we write extra code. –  dku.rajkumar Feb 16 '12 at 15:39
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