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I am nearly getting mad while trying to resolve this problem:

In my application users can register and delete themselfes. The create date and the delete date are persisted in the database as a timestamp. I need to know for each day in a range of days, how many registered and not deleted users existed on that day.

So if I have 10 existing users on 2012-02-01, one user that deleted the account on 2012-02-03, three users that registered on 2012-02-04 and two users deleted on 2012-02-06, and query the total number of registered users from 2012-02-01 until 2012-02-07 I'd like to get a result like this:

day              total_users
2012-02-01       10
2012-02-02       10
2012-02-03       9
2012-02-04       12
2012-02-05       12
2012-02-06       10
2012-02-07       10

This is how my simplified user table looks like:

user_id, user_name, created_at, deleted_at

It is no problem to get the number of registered and not deleted users for one specific day (here 2012-02-01, which will get me a 10 in my example):

select application.application_id as application_id, count(user.user_id) as user_total
from application, user
where application.application_id = user.application_id
and date(user.created_at) <= '2012-02-01'
and ((date(user.deleted_at) > '2012-02-01') or (user.deleted_at is null))

Who has a clue how I can create a query (without a cursor) that will have my expected result? My database is a MySQL 5.0.51 on Debian.

Thanks in advance Marcus

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a table with a list of dates in it (called something like calendar), you could use a query like this:

select c.calendar_date, count(*) user_total
from calendar c
left join user u
       on date(u.created_at) <= c.calendar_date and 
          (date(u.deleted_at) > c.calendar_date or u.deleted_at is null)
group by c.calendar_date

If you don't have a table with a list of dates in it, you can simulate one with the following query:

select * from 
(select adddate('1970-01-01',t4.i*10000 + t3.i*1000 + t2.i*100 + t1.i*10 + t0.i) calendar_date from
 (select 0 i union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9) t0,
 (select 0 i union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9) t1,
 (select 0 i union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9) t2,
 (select 0 i union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9) t3,
 (select 0 i union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9) t4) v
where calendar_date between ? /*start of date range*/ and ? /*end of date range*/ 
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Thank you very much, this works perfectly! I only had to replace the "i" in each line with t0, t1 etc, I think this is my old MySQL server's fault. –  Marcus Muench Feb 17 '12 at 8:38
    
@MarcusMuench: Oops, my fault. I have corrected the query - thanks. –  Mark Bannister Feb 17 '12 at 10:25
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SELECT date(user.created_at) as "creation_date", count(user.user_id) as "user_total"
FROM application a
INNER JOIN user u ON a.application_id = u.application_id 
WHERE date(user.created_at) <= '2012-02-01'
AND ((date(user.deleted_at) > '2012-02-01') or (user.deleted_at is null))
GROUP BY date(user.created_at)
ORDER BY date(user.created_at) ASC
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+1. @user1214154, mind that this will not list dates that don't have any registered users on that day with 0 as count. it will output only days that exist in the table –  talereader Feb 16 '12 at 16:11
    
This won't return the number of registered users for each day - instead, it will return the number of users who registered on each day. Given the sample data described in the question, it will not produce the output required - instead, it will produce a number of users and dates prior to 2012-02-01 (adding up to 10 users in total), and nothing after 2012-02-01. –  Mark Bannister Feb 16 '12 at 17:01
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