Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to script a git pull without having to enter a username and password. How would I go about doing this? The only functionality I will be using from git is "git pull".

share|improve this question
    
You can use ssh keys with git. Don't script sending a password. If you configure key-based auth, you can either use an ssh keyring that you unlock once per login, or just use a key with no passphrase. –  Daenyth Feb 16 '12 at 16:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How are you connecting to the remote git repository? If you are using an http/https endpoint, read this document, which includes information about storing your username and password in a .netrc file.

You can also embed your username and password in your remote url.

A better choice, if you have the option, is to use ssh instead (a remote accessed via ssh looks like username@somehost.com:/path/to/repo). You can then set up ssh key-based authentication, which does not require a username and password.

share|improve this answer

Use the subprocess module to run git as an external command.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that - but how do I pass the command the user name and password so it doesn't prompt? Security is not an issue. –  lodkkx Feb 16 '12 at 15:55
    
Set those in your .gitconfig - book.git-scm.com/2_setup_and_initialization.html –  snim2 Feb 16 '12 at 16:29

You can do it like this is your .git/config:

[remote "origin"]
 url = https://<user>:<pass>@github.com/whatever.git

for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Do I need to add an identical key if I use this on multiple workstations. I am not concerned about security. –  lodkkx Feb 16 '12 at 16:04
    
If you're authenticating with a username and password, then yes, typically you will use the same credentials regardless of where you are connecting from. On the other hand, if you are using ssh keys you can use a different key at each location (assuming that you are able to control the list of authorized public keys on the remote side). –  larsks Feb 16 '12 at 16:34

If you need to execute a command through a shell and interact with it sending input as if it was written from a terminal and getting the subsequent output, then you could use pexpect.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.