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Given table 'x':

Source  Dest    Type
A       B       2
A       D       2
B       C       2

Now I want the total count of Source and destination removing the matching ones..

Example of above one: For type 2, Count will be 4, i.e. Count(A,B,C,D)

I tried this:

select Count(distinct Source), Count(distinct destination),Count(distinct source)+Count( distinct destination),Type
from X
where Type=2 and Src NOT IN (select destination
    from  X
    where Type=2)

I need to simplify this query for all the types.

Let me know if there is any way I could do it.

Thanks!

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All COUNT and other aggregations need a GROUP BY in standard SQL. –  Borealid Feb 16 '12 at 15:52
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An inefficient method would be to do the following

SELECT 
  distinctMatches.type AS type,
  COUNT(DISTINCT distinctMatches.name) AS quantity
FROM
(
  (
    SELECT DISTINCT
      type,
      source AS name
     FROM x
  )
  UNION DISTINCT
  (
    SELECT DISTINCT
      type,
      destination AS name
     FROM x
  )
) AS distinctMatches
GROUP BY distinctMatches.type

This would give with your example data 1 row with type 2 and quantity 4

In an ideal world I'd look at the database design as it feels as if it should be split into multiple tables i.e. one for sources (as you seem to be grouping "source" and "destination" which indicates they are effectively the same item). If you are able to normalise the design further this type of query will be easier to do more efficiently

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Thanks a lot..It was helpful. I shall think about the normalization option suggested by you. –  user1214208 Feb 17 '12 at 3:04
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SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT a), Type
FROM (
   SELECT DISTINCT Source AS a, Type
   FROM x

   UNION ALL

   SELECT DISTINCT Dest AS a, Type
   FROM x
)
GROUP By Type

The inner union query converts your two separate columns into a single column, then the outer query takes that union'd result and counts up the individual values, grouped by Type.

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+1 Shouldn't the second select distinct be from x, not y? –  Mark Bannister Feb 16 '12 at 15:57
    
Woops, right. thanks! –  Marc B Feb 16 '12 at 15:57
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try this:

SELECT COUNT(xxx.a) as TotalCount
FROM
    (SELECT source a, type FROM tableX
        UNION
    SELECT dest a, type FROM tableX) xxx
WHERE xxx.Type = 2
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