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Why does this bit of code,

const float x[16] = {  1.1,   1.2,   1.3,     1.4,   1.5,   1.6,   1.7,   1.8,
                       1.9,   2.0,   2.1,     2.2,   2.3,   2.4,   2.5,   2.6};
const float z[16] = {1.123, 1.234, 1.345, 156.467, 1.578, 1.689, 1.790, 1.812,
                     1.923, 2.034, 2.145,   2.256, 2.367, 2.478, 2.589, 2.690};
float y[16];
for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
{
    y[i] = x[i];
}

for (int j = 0; j < 9000000; j++)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        y[i] *= x[i];
        y[i] /= z[i];
        y[i] = y[i] + 0.1f; // <--
        y[i] = y[i] - 0.1f; // <--
    }
}

run more than 10 times faster than the following bit (identical except where noted)?

const float x[16] = {  1.1,   1.2,   1.3,     1.4,   1.5,   1.6,   1.7,   1.8,
                       1.9,   2.0,   2.1,     2.2,   2.3,   2.4,   2.5,   2.6};
const float z[16] = {1.123, 1.234, 1.345, 156.467, 1.578, 1.689, 1.790, 1.812,
                     1.923, 2.034, 2.145,   2.256, 2.367, 2.478, 2.589, 2.690};
float y[16];
for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
{
    y[i] = x[i];
}

for (int j = 0; j < 9000000; j++)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        y[i] *= x[i];
        y[i] /= z[i];
        y[i] = y[i] + 0; // <--
        y[i] = y[i] - 0; // <--
    }
}

when compiling with Visual Studio 2010 SP1. (I haven't tested with other compilers.)

share|improve this question
33  
0 is an integer literal, so it is possible that it has to be converted to float at runtime. –  Zyx 2000 Feb 16 '12 at 16:14
7  
How did you measure the difference? And what options did you use when you compiled? –  James Kanze Feb 16 '12 at 16:19
80  
Why isn't the compiler just dropping the +/- 0 in this case?!? –  Michael Dorgan Feb 16 '12 at 16:25
4  
This is closely related to the issue in stackoverflow.com/questions/5180150/… –  Stephen Canon Feb 16 '12 at 19:46
49  
@Zyx2000 The compiler isn't anywhere near that stupid. Disassembling a trivial example in LINQPad shows that it spits out the same code whether you use 0, 0f, 0d, or even (int)0 in a context where a double is needed. –  millimoose Feb 17 '12 at 2:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1031 down vote accepted

Welcome to the world of denormalized floating-point! They can wreak havoc on performance!!!

Denormal (or subnormal) numbers are kind of a hack to get some extra values very close to zero out of the floating point representation. Operations on denormalized floating-point can be tens to hundreds of times slower than on normalized floating-point. This is because many processors can't handle them directly and must trap and resolve them using microcode.

If you print out the numbers after 10,000 iterations, you will see that they have converged to different values depending on whether 0 or 0.1 is used.

Here's the test code compiled on x64:

int main() {

    double start = omp_get_wtime();

    const float x[16]={1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6,1.7,1.8,1.9,2.0,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4,2.5,2.6};
    const float z[16]={1.123,1.234,1.345,156.467,1.578,1.689,1.790,1.812,1.923,2.034,2.145,2.256,2.367,2.478,2.589,2.690};
    float y[16];
    for(int i=0;i<16;i++)
    {
        y[i]=x[i];
    }
    for(int j=0;j<9000000;j++)
    {
        for(int i=0;i<16;i++)
        {
            y[i]*=x[i];
            y[i]/=z[i];
#ifdef FLOATING
            y[i]=y[i]+0.1f;
            y[i]=y[i]-0.1f;
#else
            y[i]=y[i]+0;
            y[i]=y[i]-0;
#endif

            if (j > 10000)
                cout << y[i] << "  ";
        }
        if (j > 10000)
            cout << endl;
    }

    double end = omp_get_wtime();
    cout << end - start << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Output:

#define FLOATING
1.78814e-007  1.3411e-007  1.04308e-007  0  7.45058e-008  6.70552e-008  6.70552e-008  5.58794e-007  3.05474e-007  2.16067e-007  1.71363e-007  1.49012e-007  1.2666e-007  1.11759e-007  1.04308e-007  1.04308e-007
1.78814e-007  1.3411e-007  1.04308e-007  0  7.45058e-008  6.70552e-008  6.70552e-008  5.58794e-007  3.05474e-007  2.16067e-007  1.71363e-007  1.49012e-007  1.2666e-007  1.11759e-007  1.04308e-007  1.04308e-007

//#define FLOATING
6.30584e-044  3.92364e-044  3.08286e-044  0  1.82169e-044  1.54143e-044  2.10195e-044  2.46842e-029  7.56701e-044  4.06377e-044  3.92364e-044  3.22299e-044  3.08286e-044  2.66247e-044  2.66247e-044  2.24208e-044
6.30584e-044  3.92364e-044  3.08286e-044  0  1.82169e-044  1.54143e-044  2.10195e-044  2.45208e-029  7.56701e-044  4.06377e-044  3.92364e-044  3.22299e-044  3.08286e-044  2.66247e-044  2.66247e-044  2.24208e-044

Note how in the second run the numbers are very close to zero.

Denormalized numbers are generally rare and thus most processors don't try to handle them efficiently.


To demonstrate that this has everything to do with denormalized numbers, if we flush denormals to zero by adding this to the start of the code:

_MM_SET_FLUSH_ZERO_MODE(_MM_FLUSH_ZERO_ON);

Then the version with 0 is no longer 10x slower and actually becomes faster. (This requires that the code be compiled with SSE enabled.)

This means that rather than using these weird lower precision almost-zero values, we just round to zero instead.

Timings: Core i7 920 @ 3.5 GHz:

//  Don't flush denormals to zero.
0.1f: 0.564067
0   : 26.7669

//  Flush denormals to zero.
0.1f: 0.587117
0   : 0.341406

In the end, this really has nothing to do with whether it's an integer or floating-point. The 0 or 0.1f is converted/stored into a register outside of both loops. So that has no effect on performance.

share|improve this answer
49  
I'm still finding it a little weird that the "+ 0" isn't completely optimized out by the compiler by default. Would this have happened if he had put "+ 0.0f"? –  s73v3r Feb 16 '12 at 19:10
18  
@s73v3r That's a very good question. Now that I look at the assembly, not even + 0.0f gets optimized out. If I had to guess, it could be that + 0.0f would have side-effects if y[i] happened to be a signalling NaN or something... I could be wrong though. –  Mysticial Feb 16 '12 at 19:31
147  
This is a common issue in audio signal processing. Signal followed by silence fed into recursive filters (common in "virtual analog" synthesizers, EQs, etc) yields exponentially decaying values within the filter's memory, and when they decay into the denormal realm, performance falls off a cliff. Different CPU architectures handle denormals differently, with Intel's Pentium 4 notorious for being about 250 times slower on denorms, while AMD takes more like a 10:1 hit. –  Russell Borogove Feb 16 '12 at 19:35
10  
@Isaac because when y[i] is significantly smaller than 0.1 adding it results in a loss of precision because the most significant digit in the number becomes higher. –  Dan Neely Feb 17 '12 at 13:28
22  
@s73v3r: The +0.f cannot be optimized out because floating-point has a negative 0, and the result of adding +0.f to -.0f is +0.f. So adding 0.f is not an identity operation and cannot be optimized out. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 6 '12 at 17:59

Using gcc and applying a diff to the generated assembly yields only this difference:

73c68,69
<   movss   LCPI1_0(%rip), %xmm1
---
>   movabsq $0, %rcx
>   cvtsi2ssq   %rcx, %xmm1
81d76
<   subss   %xmm1, %xmm0

The cvtsi2ssq one being 10 times slower indeed.

Apparently, the float version uses an XMM register loaded from memory, while the int version converts a real int value 0 to float using the cvtsi2ssq instruction, taking a lot of time. Passing -O3 to gcc doesn't help. (gcc version 4.2.1.)

(Using double instead of float doesn't matter, except that it changes the cvtsi2ssq into a cvtsi2sdq.)

Update

Some extra tests show that it is not necessarily the cvtsi2ssq instruction. Once eliminated (using a int ai=0;float a=ai; and using a instead of 0), the speed difference remains. So @Mysticial is right, the denormalized floats make the difference. This can be seen by testing values between 0 and 0.1f. The turning point in the above code is approximately at 0.00000000000000000000000000000001, when the loops suddenly takes 10 times as long.

Update<<1

A small visualisation of this interesting phenomenon:

  • Column 1: a float, divided by 2 for every iteration
  • Column 2: the binary representation of this float
  • Column 3: the time taken to sum this float 1e7 times

You can clearly see the exponent (the last 9 bits) change to its lowest value, when denormalization sets in. At that point, simple addition becomes 20 times slower.

0.000000000000000000000000000000000100000004670110: 10111100001101110010000011100000 45 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000050000002335055: 10111100001101110010000101100000 43 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000025000001167528: 10111100001101110010000001100000 43 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000012500000583764: 10111100001101110010000110100000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000006250000291882: 10111100001101110010000010100000 48 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000003125000145941: 10111100001101110010000100100000 43 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000001562500072970: 10111100001101110010000000100000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000781250036485: 10111100001101110010000111000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000390625018243: 10111100001101110010000011000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000195312509121: 10111100001101110010000101000000 43 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000097656254561: 10111100001101110010000001000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000048828127280: 10111100001101110010000110000000 44 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000024414063640: 10111100001101110010000010000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000012207031820: 10111100001101110010000100000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000006103515209: 01111000011011100100001000000000 789 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000003051757605: 11110000110111001000010000000000 788 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000001525879503: 00010001101110010000100000000000 788 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000762939751: 00100011011100100001000000000000 795 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000381469876: 01000110111001000010000000000000 896 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000190734938: 10001101110010000100000000000000 813 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000095366768: 00011011100100001000000000000000 798 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000047683384: 00110111001000010000000000000000 791 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000023841692: 01101110010000100000000000000000 802 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000011920846: 11011100100001000000000000000000 809 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000005961124: 01111001000010000000000000000000 795 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000002980562: 11110010000100000000000000000000 835 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000001490982: 00010100001000000000000000000000 864 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000745491: 00101000010000000000000000000000 915 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000372745: 01010000100000000000000000000000 918 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000186373: 10100001000000000000000000000000 881 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000092486: 01000010000000000000000000000000 857 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000046243: 10000100000000000000000000000000 861 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000022421: 00001000000000000000000000000000 855 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000011210: 00010000000000000000000000000000 887 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000005605: 00100000000000000000000000000000 799 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000002803: 01000000000000000000000000000000 828 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001401: 10000000000000000000000000000000 815 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000: 00000000000000000000000000000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000: 00000000000000000000000000000000 42 ms
0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000: 00000000000000000000000000000000 44 ms

An equivalent discussion about ARM can be found in Stack Overflow question Denormalized floating point in Objective-C?.

share|improve this answer
32  
+1 for the effort, and showing that empirical testing could have shown the trigger condition there –  sehe Feb 16 '12 at 23:18
141  
This is cool ASCII art for the tip of a blade. Metaphor? –  Chris Feb 17 '12 at 1:53
12  
Cloud Strife's sword instantly comes to mind! –  Dave Feb 17 '12 at 8:51
12  
-Os don't fix it, but -ffast-math does. (I use that all the time, IMO the corner cases where it causes precision trouble shouldn't turn up in a properly designed program anyway.) –  leftaroundabout Feb 17 '12 at 10:17
4  
Wish I could +1 again for that pretty 'almost-ascii-art' visualization. I guess it will work wonders for people who never looked at binary floating point representations before! –  sehe Feb 23 '12 at 8:44

In gcc you can enable FTZ and DAZ with this:

#include <xmmintrin.h>

#define FTZ 1
#define DAZ 1   

void enableFtzDaz()
{
    int mxcsr = _mm_getcsr ();

    if (FTZ) {
            mxcsr |= (1<<15) | (1<<11);
    }

    if (DAZ) {
            mxcsr |= (1<<6);
    }

    _mm_setcsr (mxcsr);
}

also use gcc switches: -msse -mfpmath=sse

(corresponding credits to Carl Hetherington [1])

[1] http://carlh.net/plugins/denormals.php

share|improve this answer
    
Also see fesetround() from fenv.h (defined for C99) for another, more portable way of rounding (linux.die.net/man/3/fesetround) (but this would affect all FP operations, not just subnormals) –  German Garcia Oct 2 '12 at 13:52
    
Are you sure you need 1<<15 and 1<<11 for FTZ? I have only seen 1<<15 quoted elsewhere... –  fig Feb 26 at 11:45
    
@fig: 1<<11 is for the Underflow Mask. More info here: softpixel.com/~cwright/programming/simd/sse.php –  German Garcia Feb 26 at 16:29
    
@GermanGarcia this does not answer the OPs question; the question was "Why does this bit of code, runs 10 times faster than..." - you should either attempt to answer that before providing this workaround or provide this in a comment. –  vaxquis Jul 24 at 23:41

It's due to denormalized floating-point use. How to get rid of both it and the performance penalty? Having scoured the Internet for ways of killing denormal numbers, it seems there is no "best" way to do this yet. I have found these three methods that may work best in different environments:

  • Might not work in some GCC environments:

    // Requires #include <fenv.h>
    fesetenv(FE_DFL_DISABLE_SSE_DENORMS_ENV);
    
  • Might not work in some Visual Studio environments: 1

    // Requires #include <xmmintrin.h>
    _mm_setcsr( _mm_getcsr() | (1<<15) | (1<<6) );
    // Does both FTZ and DAZ bits. You can also use just hex value 0x8040 to do both.
    // You might also want to use the underflow mask (1<<11)
    
  • Appears to work in both GCC and Visual Studio:

    // Requires #include <xmmintrin.h>
    // Requires #include <pmmintrin.h>
    _MM_SET_FLUSH_ZERO_MODE(_MM_FLUSH_ZERO_ON);
    _MM_SET_DENORMALS_ZERO_MODE(_MM_DENORMALS_ZERO_ON);
    
  • The Intel compiler has options to disable denormals by default on modern Intel CPUs. More details here

  • Compiler switches. -ffast-math, -msse or -mfpmath=sse will disable denormals and make a few other things faster, but unfortunately also do lots of other approximations that might break your code. Test carefully! The equivalent of fast-math for the Visual Studio compiler is /fp:fast but I haven't been able to confirm whether this also disables denormals.1

share|improve this answer
    
This sounds like a decent answer to a different but related question (How can I prevent numeric computations from producing denormal results?) It doesn't answer this question, though. –  Ben Voigt Jun 21 at 21:28
    
@BenVoigt IFTFY –  vaxquis Jul 23 at 15:45

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