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How to concatenate Object with a string (primitive) without overloading and explicit type cast (str())?

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, text):
        self.text = text

    def __str__(self):
        return self.text


_string = Foo('text') + 'string'

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 10, in <module>
      _string = Foo('text') + 'string'

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'type' and 'str'

operator + must be overloaded? Is there other ways (just wondering)?

PS: I know about overloading operators and type casting (like str(Foo('text')))

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What is your expected result in _string? "textstring" ? –  Rod Feb 16 '12 at 16:06
    
I want return a string. just wondering! –  tomas Feb 16 '12 at 16:06
3  
Why don't you want to use str to force the object into a string? –  Marcin Feb 16 '12 at 16:09
    
Python doesn't have casting. When you call str, you create a new string object by the return value of MyType.__str__. Casting is taking the same data in memory and telling the compiler/interpreter that it is another object type. –  Daenyth Feb 16 '12 at 16:17
    
I'm just curious why __ str__ doesn't return the string? –  tomas Feb 16 '12 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just define the __add__() and __radd__() methods:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, text):
        self.text = text
    def __str__(self):
        return self.text
    def __add__(self, other):
        return str(self) + other
    def __radd__(self, other):
        return other + str(self)

They will be called depending on whether you do Foo("b") + "a" (calls __add__()) or "a" + Foo("b") (calls __radd__()).

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1  
IMO this is not good practice. Calling str explicitly is the correct pattern. Anyway, you're still calling str here, you're just hiding it. –  Daenyth Feb 16 '12 at 16:22
    
@Daenyth, I think it depends on the circumstances. This isn't appropriate for any old object; but for something meant to emulate a string, it's perfectly reasonable. –  senderle Feb 16 '12 at 16:27
    
@Daenyth: I agree with you, but there might be exceptions. –  Sven Marnach Feb 16 '12 at 16:30
    
@senderle: The first thing I'd try to emulate a string is to derive from str. Only if this is no option for some reason, I'd go with the approach above. –  Sven Marnach Feb 16 '12 at 16:31
1  
@SvenMarnach, yes, that's what I meant by "emulate." Perhaps I was being unclear; in my mind, a type that inherits from str is doing something more than "emulating" a string. –  senderle Feb 16 '12 at 16:43
_string = Foo('text') + 'string'

The problem with this line is that Python thinks you want to add a string to an object of type Foo, not the other way around.

It would work though if you'd write:

_string = "%s%s" % (Foo('text'), 'string')

EDIT

You could try it with

_string = 'string' + Foo('text')

In this case your Foo object should be automatically casted to a string.

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1  
Are you sure about your edit? I'm pretty sure Python won't cast to string automatically. –  Sven Marnach Feb 16 '12 at 16:10
    
@Constantinius, Thanx for the anwer, but I know about type casting. I want to understand how to return the real string from __str__ –  tomas Feb 16 '12 at 16:10
1  
There's no such thing as Python casting objects to strings. Either the __add__ method will do it explicitly or no one will do. –  JBernardo Feb 16 '12 at 16:16
    
I thought of '{}{}'.format(Foo('text'), 'string') first. Maybe this is also an option... –  Gandaro Feb 16 '12 at 17:45

If that makes sense for your Foo object, you can overload the __add__ method as follows:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, text):
        self.text = text

    def __str__(self):
        return self.text

    def __add__(self, other):
        return str(self) + other

_string = Foo('text') + 'string'
print _string

Example output:

textstring
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