Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this generic method in my repository:

public T GetFirstOrDefault(Expression<Func<T, bool>> where, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector, bool ascending)
{
    if (ascending)
    {
        return dbset.Where(where).OrderBy(keySelector).FirstOrDefault<T>();
    }
    else
    {
        return dbset.Where(where).OrderByDescending(keySelector).FirstOrDefault<T>();
    }
}

And I would like to be able to use it like this, where DateCreated is of type DateTime:

someRepository.GetFirstOrDefault(m => m.myprop == someValue, m => m.DateCreated, true);

and like this, where Id is of type Int:

someRepository.GetFirstOrDefault(m => m.myprop == someValue, m => m.Id, true);

and like this, where Name is of type string:

someRepository.GetFirstOrDefault(m => m.myprop == someValue, m => m.Name, true)

However, it gives me the following error when I use it:

Unable to cast the type 'System.DateTime' to type 'System.Object'. LINQ to Entities only supports casting Entity Data Model primitive types.

After doing some research, I found out that maybe I have to use a keySelector of type Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> or something like that, and this is where I am getting confused. If I declare my method like this, I am not sure where TKey should be coming from:

public T GetFirstOrDefault(Expression<Func<T, bool>> where, Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> keySelector, bool ascending) { }

Am I on the right path? How should my OrderBy clause be declared?

share|improve this question
    
Which property is of type DateTime? –  ArsenMkrt Feb 16 '12 at 16:14
    
Your method name is somewhat confusing. You're effectively doing a Min/Max function but overloading the name of another kind of method that does something completely different. I'd be careful with that. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 16 '12 at 16:20
    
@ArsenMkrt: All my models derive from a base model that has a DateCreated property which is of type DateTime. –  Jean-François Beauchamp Feb 16 '12 at 17:59
    
@JeffMercado Could you elaborate a little bit? What you are saying sounds interesting, but I am not sure what other function I am overloading? –  Jean-François Beauchamp Feb 16 '12 at 18:00
    
When I see the method FirstOrDefault(), I expect it to return the first item in the collection or the default value for the type if it is empty. This is a standard LINQ method. Here you're defining a similarly named method that does something completely different hence the confusion. The implementation is the pattern typically used to find item in a collection that is a minimum or maximum. I'd name this method something else. Some libraries that does this calls it MinBy() or MaxBy(). I'd suggest naming it MinMaxByOrDefault() or something along those lines. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 16 '12 at 18:18
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems this method is part of a generic class, which is where the type parameter T is coming from. If you need another type parameter just for this method, you have to make the method itself generic:

public T GetFirstOrDefault<TKey>(
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> where,
    Expression<Func<T, TKey>> keySelector,
    bool ascending)

You can then call it and specify the parameter explicitly:

someRepository.GetFirstOrDefault<string>(m => m.myprop == someValue, m => m.Name, true)

Or let the compiler infer it:

someRepository.GetFirstOrDefault(m => m.myprop == someValue, m => m.Name, true)

(Note that you certainly don't want assignment = in the first lambda, you want ==. Fortunately, your code wouldn't even compile.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed explanations! I thought I had tried that and that it did not work, but I must have done something a bit different, because now it is working. –  Jean-François Beauchamp Feb 16 '12 at 19:30
    
Thanks for nice solution! –  Chuck Norris Mar 19 '12 at 15:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.