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This is probably the easiest question to answer that you will find on stackoverflow, but I would like to get this confusion out of my head once and for all. Consider the following if statement:

if(x > 0)
{
    echo 'Inside if';
}
// apparently there is a hidden else here....

echo 'This comes after if';

And now consider the following one:

if(x > 0)
{
    echo 'Inside if';
}
else
{
    echo 'Inside else';
}

echo 'This comes after if/else';

In the first example, if the condition evaluates to true, "Inside if" will be printed, but won't what comes after the if ("This comes after if") get printed also? I mean, I don't have return inside my if, so the code should continue normally, right?. Same thing for the second if statement, whatever comes after the statement will get printed because the execution of the code will continue normally. Is there really a virtual else after an if-statement if we don't explicitly define one? I mean, if what comes after my if statement is printed whether the condition evaluates to true or not, then there's not really a virtual else after my if. Also, When is an Else absolutely necessary in an if-then-else statement instead of just relying on the "virtual else" as in the first example? Please shed some light on this.

Thank you

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You're correct that there is no "virtual" else. Anything outside the {} will be executed regardless of whether the conditions evaluate to true. –  Michael Berkowski Feb 16 '12 at 16:23
    
Yes - Your last echo is outside the if/else block and will be executed always. –  Mike Christensen Feb 16 '12 at 16:23
    
So in both examples, the final echo will be printed. If this occurred in a function, you could return before reaching that line and it wouldn't be printed, or an exception could be thrown which causes it not to be reached, but in a simple if/else it will always execute since it isn't part of the conditional block. –  Michael Berkowski Feb 16 '12 at 16:23
    
You can't think of an instance where you would want code to run in the IF and after the IF closes but NOT in the ELSE? –  BD. Feb 16 '12 at 16:23

5 Answers 5

An else is "absolutely necessary" whenever you want to actually do something if the if condition evaluated to false. If you only want to do something in the case where it's true, and absolutely nothing when it's false, you can skip the else part.

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There isn't really a hidden else. A conditional statement is a way to branch off the procedural execution of your code temporarily. Once completed, it will continue where it left off unless you do a return from within a function for example.

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Ok, for some reason, I always thought that if you don't specify en else statement, then whatever comes after an if statement is considered to be inside an else statement –  user765368 Feb 16 '12 at 16:30
    
Ah, there you go. The code in an IF is self-contained. Everything outside the IF is unrelated. :) –  BD. Feb 16 '12 at 16:32

Simple example of where you need an ELSE:

IF (loadfile == True)
{
    println("file loaded...on to processing...");
}
ELSE
{
    :: raise an error and stop execution ::
}

:: continue with processing file ::
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The difference between the "virtual else" and the else is that the virtual else is always executed, whereas the real else is only conditionally executed. For example, consider that this:

if(x > 0)
{
    echo 'Inside if';
}
else
{
    echo 'Inside else';
}

echo 'This comes after if/else';

is exactly the same as this:

if(x > 0)
{
    echo 'Inside if';
}
if(x <= 0)
{
    echo 'Inside else';
}
if(x == x)
{
    echo 'This comes after if/else';
}

Your "virtual else" is not really an else at all, it is always executed.

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Let us say X = 1 first example outcome:

Inside if This comes after if

second example outcome:

Inside if This comes after if/else


Let us say X = -1 first example outcome:

This comes after if

second example outcome:

Inside else This comes after if/else


There is no virtual else statement, you must include an else statement explicitly.

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