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I have the following MySQL table (table size - around 10K records):

CREATE TABLE `tmp_index_test` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `m_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `r_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `price` float DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `m_key` (`m_id`),
  KEY `r_key` (`r_id`),
  KEY `price_key` (`price`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=16390 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

As you can see, I have two INTEGER fields (r_id and m_id) and one FLOAT field (price). For each of these fields I have an index.

Now, when I run a query with condition on the first integer AND on the second one, everything is fine:

mysql> explain select * from tmp_index_test where m_id=1 and r_id=2;
+----+-------------+----------------+-------------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table          | type        | possible_keys | key         | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                                     |
+----+-------------+----------------+-------------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | tmp_index_test | index_merge | m_key,r_key   | r_key,m_key | 5,5     | NULL |    1 | Using intersect(r_key,m_key); Using where |
+----+-------------+----------------+-------------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------------------------------------+

Seems like MySQL performs it very well since there is the Using intersect(r_key,m_key) in the Extra field. I'm not a MySQL expert, but according to what I understand, MySQL is first making the intersection on indexes, and only then collects the result of the intersection from the table itself.

HOWEVER, when I run very similar query, but instead of condition on two integers, I put similar condition on an integer and a float, MySQL refuses to intersect the result on indexes:

mysql> explain select * from tmp_index_test where m_id=3 and price=100;
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-----------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table          | type | possible_keys   | key       | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-----------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | tmp_index_test | ref  | m_key,price_key | price_key | 5       | const |    1 | Using where |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-----------+---------+-------+------+-------------+

As you can see, MySQL decides to use the index of price only.

My first question is why, and how to fix it?

In addition to it, I need to run queries with MORE sign (>) instead of the equal sign (=) on price. Currently explain shows that for such queries, MySQL uses the integer key only.

mysql> explain select * from tmp_index_test where m_id=3 and price > 100;
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table          | type | possible_keys   | key   | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | tmp_index_test | ref  | m_key,price_key | m_key | 5       | const |    2 | Using where |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+-----------------+-------+---------+-------+------+-------------+

I need to make somehow MySQL first do the intersection on indexes. Anybody has any idea how?

Thanks a lot in advance!

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1 Answer 1

From the MySQL manual:

ref is used if the join uses only a leftmost prefix of the key or if the key is not a PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE index (in other words, if the join cannot select a single row based on the key value). If the key that is used matches only a few rows, this is a good join type.

price is not unique or primary, so ref is chosen. I don't believe you can force an intersect.

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But neither m_id nor i_id unique / primary, but for them index_merge was used. Anybody knows why? –  diemacht Feb 21 '12 at 9:34

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