Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm only working on my 3rd Javascript project, so this is probably easy to answer (at least I hope so).

I have learned to use JS object in place of arrays. In this project I have named multiple object with a nested system of IDs as follows:

animalia = new Object();
animalia.chordata = new Object();
animalia.chordata.actinopterygii = new Object();
animalia.chordata.actinopterygii.acipenseriformes = new Object();
etc.......

I'm having problems calling on objects named this way though. Here is my code:

function expand(event){
    var target = event.target;
    console.log(target);
    var parent = target.parentNode;
    console.log(parent);
    var parentclass = parent.getAttribute("class");
    console.log(parentclass);
    if (parentclass == "kingdom"){
        var newdiv = document.createElement("div");
        var newexpctrl = document.createElement("div");
        var parentid = parent.getAttribute("id");
        console.log(parentid);  
  ----> var parentobj = window[parentid];
        console.log(parentobj);}
    else{
        var upperclass = searchArray(parentclass);
        console.log(upperclass);
        var newdiv = document.createElement("div");
        var newexpctrl = document.createElement("div");
        var parentId = parent.getAttribute("id");
        console.log(parentId);
        var parentnode_ = document.getElementById(parentId);
        console.log(parentnode_);
        var gparentId = parentnode_.parentNode.id;
        console.log(gparentId);
  ----> var parentobj = window[gparentId.parentId];
        console.log(parentobj);
    }
    var childnumb = parentobj.children;
}

I am having my problem with the two statements indicated by "---->". In the first case, using a single variable works for pulling up the proper object. However, in the second case, using two variables, I fail to be able to access the proper object. What is the proper syntax for doing this? I have tried a plethora of different syntax combinations, but nothing seems to work correctly. Or should is there a better method for calling on JS objects other than using "window[variable]"?

P.S.- If you haven't figured it out by now, I am working on educational tools for use in learning biology. Thanks once again stackoverflow, you guys rule.

share|improve this question
1  
Use {} in place of new Object(). – Jan Kuča Feb 16 '12 at 16:45
    
Actually, I just have "= new Object;". I mistyped that when putting my code here on stackoverflow. The objects are valid none-the-less as they show up in the debugger as objects. – WyoBuckeye Feb 16 '12 at 16:49
    
That's the same thing. I'm just making a suggestion here. It has really nothing to do with the problem. – Jan Kuča Feb 16 '12 at 16:50
    
I'll keep that in mind. Thanks. – WyoBuckeye Feb 16 '12 at 16:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that the window object has something w/ the property matching a string that's the value of gparentId, you should be able to do:

var parentobj = window[gparentId][parentId];
share|improve this answer
    
This worked. Something so easy, yet the answer has eluded me for hours. <sigh>. – WyoBuckeye Feb 16 '12 at 16:52

The problem here is that the square bracket's notation is being applied to too much. gparentId is a string. It doesn't have a property called parentId. You therefore have to do this in two steps. First get:

window[gparentId]

Then get the appropriate property of that object

var parentobj = window[gparentId][parentId];

On a somewhat unrelated note, this isn't very well written JavaScript code:

Creating Objects

When creating new objects, always use the following syntax:

var obj = {};

That's what's generally been accepted as standard, so it's easier for people to read.

Declaring Variables in If Statements

You shouldn't really declare variables inside an if statement, especially when declaring the same variable in the else block, that's really confusing. Instead, declare all the variables at the top in a list and then use them without the var keyword lower down.

var newdiv = document.createElement("div"),
  newexpctrl = document.createElement("div"),
  parentid = parent.getAttribute("id"),
  parentobj;

Note the commas instead of semi-colons which means I don't have to repeat the var keyword. Since the values of newdiv, newexpctrl and parentid are the same in either case, I give them their values straight away, making the contents of the if statement much shorter and easier to digest.

Result

function expand(event){
    var target = event.target;
    var parent = target.parentNode;
    var parentclass = parent.getAttribute("class");

    var newdiv = document.createElement("div"),
      newexpctrl = document.createElement("div"),
      parentid = parent.getAttribute("id"),
      parentobj, upperclass;

    if (parentclass == "kingdom"){
        parentobj = window[parentid];
    }else{
        upperclass = searchArray(parentclass);
        var _parentId = document.getElementById(parentId).parentNode.id;
        parentobj = window[_parentId][parentId];
    }
    var childnumb = parentobj.children;
}

Note that I've left var _parentId inside the if since I think it probably improves readability, but you may choose to take it outside the if, since it will pollute the namespace of the function anyway.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.