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The scenario

I've got two tables with identical structure.

TABLE [INFORMATION], [SYNC_INFORMATION]

    [ITEM] [nvarchar](255) NOT NULL
    [DESCRIPTION] [nvarchar](255) NULL
    [EXTRA] [nvarchar](255) NULL
    [UNIT] [nvarchar](2) NULL
    [COST] [float] NULL
    [STOCK] [nvarchar](1) NULL
    [CURRENCY] [nvarchar](255) NULL
    [LASTUPDATE] [nvarchar](50) NULL
    [IN] [nvarchar](4) NULL
    [CLIENT] [nvarchar](255) NULL

I'm trying to create a synchronize procedure that will be triggered by a scheduled event at a given time every day.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_SynchronizeInformation]
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    --Update all rows
    UPDATE TARGET_TABLE
    SET TARGET_TABLE.[DESCRIPTION] = SOURCE_TABLE.[DESCRIPTION],
        TARGET_TABLE.[EXTRA] = SOURCE_TABLE.[EXTRA],
        TARGET_TABLE.[UNIT] = SOURCE_TABLE.[UNIT],
        TARGET_TABLE.[COST] = SOURCE_TABLE.[COST],
        TARGET_TABLE.[STOCK] = SOURCE_TABLE.[STOCK],
        TARGET_TABLE.[CURRENCY] = SOURCE_TABLE.[CURRENCY],
        TARGET_TABLE.[LASTUPDATE] = SOURCE_TABLE.[LASTUPDATE],
        TARGET_TABLE.[IN] = SOURCE_TABLE.[IN],
        TARGET_TABLE.[CLIENT] = SOURCE_TABLE.[CLIENT]
    FROM SYNC_INFORMATION TARGET_TABLE 
        JOIN LSERVER.dbo.INFORMATION SOURCE_TABLE ON TARGET_TABLE.ITEMNO = SOURCE_TABLE.ITEMNO
    WHERE TARGET_TABLE.ITEMNO = SOURCE_TABLE.ITEMNO

    --Add new rows
    INSERT INTO SYNC_INFORMATION (ITEMNO, DESCRIPTION, EXTRA, UNIT, STANDARDCOST, STOCKTYPE, CURRENCY_ID, LASTSTANDARDUPDATE, IN_ID, CLIENTCODE)
    SELECT 
        src.ITEM, 
        src.DESCRIPTION,
        src.EXTRA,
        src.UNIT,
        src.COST,
        src.STOCKTYPE,
        src.CURRENCY_ID,
        src.LASTUPDATE,
        src.IN,
        src.CLIENT
    FROM LSERVER.dbo.INFORMATION src
        LEFT JOIN SYNC_INFORMATION targ ON src.ITEMNO = targ.ITEMNO
    WHERE
        targ.ITEMNO IS NULL
END

Currently, this procedure (including some others that are also executed at the same time) takes about 15 seconds to execute. I'm planning on adding a "Synchronize" button in my work interface so that users can manually synchronize when, for instance, a new item is added and needs to be used the same day.

But in order for me to do that, I need to trim those 15 seconds as much as possible.


Instead of updating every single row, like in my procedure, is it possible to only update rows that have values that does not match?
This would greatly increase the execution speed, since it doesn't have to update all the 4000 rows when maybe only 20 actually needs it.

Can this be done in a better way, or optimized?
Does it need improvements, if yes, where?

How would you solve this?

Would also appreciate some time differences between the solutions so I can compare them.

UPDATE

Using marc_s's CHECKSUM is really brilliant. The problem is that in some instances the information creates the same checksum. Here's an example, due to the classified content, I can only show you 2 columns, but I can say that all columns have identical information except these 2. To clarify: this screenshot is of all the rows that had duplicate CHECKSUMs. These are also the only rows with a hyphen in the ITEM column, I've looked.

enter image description here

The query was simply

SELECT *, CHECKSUM(*) FROM SYNC_INFORMATION
share|improve this question
    
Which version of SQL Server are you using?? SQL Server 2008 has the new MERGE command exactly for this kind of scenario.... – marc_s Feb 16 '12 at 16:49
    
@Fosco Should probably have mentioned that one of the tables are located on another very busy server, where I only have read permission. I'm using that data to do some calculations in my interface, so to take the workload off, I transfer the data to another server and only synchronize when it's needed. – ShadowScripter Feb 16 '12 at 16:49
    
@marc_s Both servers are 2005. Currently, the clustered index is the same as the primary key, ITEMNO. There are no other indices so far. – ShadowScripter Feb 16 '12 at 17:04
    
I can't see ITEMNO in your table structure...... what kind of column is it? An INT ?? – marc_s Feb 16 '12 at 17:10
    
@marc_s Oh, sorry, I changed the names. I'll fix it. ITEMNO is ITEM, and it's a nvarchar. – ShadowScripter Feb 16 '12 at 17:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you can change the table structure ever so slightly - you could add a computed CHECKSUM column to your two tables, and in the case the ITEM is identical, you could then check that checksum column to see if there are any differences at all in the columns of the table.

If you can do this - try something like this here:

ALTER TABLE dbo.[INFORMATION]
  ADD CheckSumColumn AS CHECKSUM([DESCRIPTION], [EXTRA], [UNIT],
                                 [COST], [STOCK], [CURRENCY],
                                 [LASTUPDATE], [IN], [CLIENT]) PERSISTED

Of course: only include those columns that should be considered when making sure whether a source and a target row are identical ! (this depends on your needs and requirements)

This persists a new column to your table, which is calculated as the checksum over the columns specified in the list of arguments to the CHECKSUM function.

This value is persisted, i.e. it could be indexed, too! :-O

Now, you could simplify your UPDATE to

 UPDATE TARGET_TABLE
 SET ......
 FROM SYNC_INFORMATION TARGET_TABLE 
 JOIN LSERVER.dbo.INFORMATION SOURCE_TABLE ON TARGET_TABLE.ITEMNO = SOURCE_TABLE.ITEMNO
 WHERE 
     TARGET_TABLE.ITEMNO = SOURCE_TABLE.ITEMNO
     AND TARGET_TABLE.CheckSumColumn <> SOURCE_TABLE.CheckSumColumn

Read more about the CHECKSUM T-SQL function on MSDN!

share|improve this answer
    
I wrote in one of the comments that I only have read permissions on one of the servers. So I can't add any columns :/ However, I must say that that is a brilliant solution. It's like a custom HASH index on all the columns combined per row! Is it possible to do TARGET_TABLE.ChecksumColumn <> CHECKSUM(column1, column2, column3, column4...), and also not taking up too much computations? Because that would be such an excellent solution. – ShadowScripter Feb 16 '12 at 17:49
    
@ShadowScripter: well yes , if you cannot change the source table, you can have it compute the CHECKSUM in the SELECT statement. Not quite as efficient as having it persisted to the table - but still hopefully a fairly good indicator whether or not something has changed! – marc_s Feb 16 '12 at 17:57
    
Didn't work, well actually it almost worked, but there were 7 rows that calculated the same checksum. Those rows are almost identical, where one had a 4 in ITEM and a 6 in DESCRIPTION, and the other had a 6 in ITEM and a 4 in DESCRIPTION, which resulted in the same checksum. – ShadowScripter Feb 16 '12 at 18:04
    
@ShadowScripter: oh - too bad .... – marc_s Feb 16 '12 at 18:06
    
@ShadowScripter did you apply a checksum to a subset of columns? I couldn't get INTs or VARCHARs to produce the same CHECKSUM() value for all combinations of (4,6). Can you show the actual rows and CHECKSUM() calculation that caused this collision? – Aaron Bertrand Feb 16 '12 at 18:44

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