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I'm studyin' some Java code written by my ex-colleague, and I've found something I cannot understand properly. Here we have a method, getGeneAvailableTaxonomies(), that seems to contain a method call with its own declaration, accept(). Is it true? Is it possibile?

Here's the code part: I cannot understand the meaning of the program from FilenameFilter() to the end.

Can you help me? Thanx!

public List<Integer> getGeneAvailableTaxonomies() {
    List<Integer> availableTaxon = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    File dataDirectory = new File(_currentApplicationPath, String.format("Data"));
    FilenameFilter filter = new FilenameFilter() {
        public boolean accept(File dir, String name) {
            return name.startsWith("gene_") && name.endsWith("_info.info"); //get all info files...
        }
    };
    String[] children = dataDirectory.list(filter);

    for(String child:children) {
        availableTaxon.add(Integer.parseInt(child.substring(child.indexOf("_")+1, child.lastIndexOf("_"))));
    }

    return availableTaxon;
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The part of the code where you see the accept() method being defined is what's called an anonymous class.

FilenameFilter filter = new FilenameFilter() {
    public boolean accept(File dir, String name) {
        return name.startsWith("gene_") && name.endsWith("_info.info"); //get all info files...
    }
};

What's going on here is the creation of a new Class that is-a FilenameFilter. They're implementing/overriding the accept method. Think of it like this, but in one statement:

class MyFilenameFilter implements FilenameFilter {
    public boolean accept(File dir, String name) {
        return name.startsWith("gene_") && name.endsWith("_info.info"); 
    }
}

FilenameFilter filter = new MyFilenameFilter()
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Thanx a lot. So, this second part you wrote has the same meanin' of my code, is it right? –  DavideChicco.it Feb 16 '12 at 17:29
    
it would accomplish the same thing, yes. –  csturtz Feb 16 '12 at 17:34

This is anonymous inner class, i.e. class that does not have its own name and is defined ad-hock together with its instance.

Actually the name of this class is as name of your outer class followed by $ and number (1, 2, 3 etc.) according to the sequential number of your inner class.

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Oh I have no university. But I learned from the Internet.

You can do that, it's not "method inside a method". It is implementing an interface.

FilenameFilter

You can do extending an abstract class or implementing an interface then apply it directly to a field/ variable. And since variables/ fields can be used inside a method, so that is possible.

Edited

You can notice the semicolon after the last curly bracket of new FilenameFilter() {.... The whole block is an expression, so it can be applied to fields/ variables...

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Those are called anonymous classes. They're described in the JLS, but you might want to read about them in "Java in a Nutshell" or some other tutorials out there to get a better handle on it.

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FilenameFilter is an interface. The syntax new FilenameFilter(){...} here creates and instantiates an anonymous class which implements FilenameFilter with implementation inside. See File to check what dataDirectory.list() does. "It returns an array of strings naming the files and directories in the directory denoted by this abstract pathname that satisfy the specified filter."

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Here's what's happening. The syntax is called an anonymous inner class. The new gives you a hint that you are creating a new class that inherits from FilenameFilter -- which is why it can be assigned to a reference of type FilenameFilter -- but that class implements a method named accept that overloads the FilenameFilter accept method. That class doesn't have a name visible to the rest of the program (although some compilers at least will create a classfile in the target directory) but its sole instance exists as long as filter remains in scope.

This is sort of an almost-lambda that showed up in Java about Java 1.2 (I think.)

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He created its own filter to decide if a file inside dataDirectory should be included in the String array or not. To do so he had to implement his own version of the only FilenameFilter interface, the accept method. Then he applied that filter to the dataDirectory.

He could have created a class that would have implemented the interface, but as it has only one method it was more convenient to implement it directly in the code, as an anonymous class.

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