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The Python library NetworkX has a fancy animated graph on their home page. But obviously there is more involved in creating that web based animation than a python library; last time I check my browser doesn't use client side python.

Which leads to my question, is the NetworkX library used at all in generating that animated graph they have on their home page? Or is that animation just there to look flashy and hold my attention?

Can NetworkX be used to create web based animations? Can it create animations client side using something like wxPython? If so, are there any examples?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, they only use javascript on the client side to do that. The code is here.

Browsers only execute javascript. Your options include learning javascript, use pyzamas or write a browser from scratch that is able to execute python code :).

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I know that browsers only execute Javascript, but does NetworkX have any features which would make it useful in creating such interactive graphs? It sounds like it doesn't. – Buttons840 Feb 16 '12 at 17:56
    
It doesn't for sure. You have to combine NetworkX's logic with the logic of another tool that renders animations. For example you can create a graph ( server side ) with NX and then render it ( client side ) with javascript. Of course, you must serialize / deserialize your graph data on both sides. There is no "native" solution for your task. – hymloth Feb 16 '12 at 19:28
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The code that produces that example is here:networkx.lanl.gov/trac/browser/networkx/examples/javascript It uses the d3.js javascript library mbostock.github.com/d3 – Aric Feb 17 '12 at 5:05

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