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Consider the table:

CREATE TABLE `information` (
    `id` char(36) NOT NULL,
    `data` text NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
)

with the trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER `information_uuid_ins_trg` 
BEFORE INSERT ON information 
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
    SET NEW.id = UUID();
END;

What I'd like to be able to do, is to know the id that was used with the previous insert statement.

INSERT INTO information ( data ) VALUES ('[some data]')

Given a replicated master-master environment where the [some data] is not guaranteed to be unique. Obviously the last_insert_id() can't be used since the field is not an auto_increment field. Adding an update of a temp table with LAST_INSERT_ID(UUID( )) won't work since LAST_INSERT_ID(expr) expects an integer value as expr. In OracleRDBMS I would approach this with:

INSERT INTO information 
(data) values ('[some data]') 
RETURNING id INTO var_id

or with Microsoft SQL Server / Postgres I would use:

INSERT INTO information 
(data) values ('[some data]') 
OUTPUT INSERTED.*

This would all be called from a PHP frontend running on a collection of webservers.

Any thoughts as to how to return the uuid pk in mysql?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since MySQL doesn't seem to have any built in functionality to help you out, I sadly can't think of anything better than this "hack";

DELIMITER //

CREATE TRIGGER `information_uuid_retrieve` 
AFTER INSERT ON information 
FOR EACH ROW 
BEGIN 
  SET @INSERT_ID=NEW.id; 
END;//

DELIMITER ;

INSERT INTO information (data) VALUES ('olle');

SELECT @INSERT_ID;
+--------------------------------------+
| @INSERT_ID                           |
+--------------------------------------+
| f42f4044-58d0-11e1-8f90-93738648d450 |
+--------------------------------------+
share|improve this answer
    
Why the two step process? Why not SET @INSERT_ID = NEW.ID ? – Michael MacDonald Feb 16 '12 at 20:11
    
@MichaelMacDonald Good point, I got an error earlier about no statement being defined, but when I try now again it seems to work just fine. Updating the answer with the simpler version. – Joachim Isaksson Feb 16 '12 at 20:21
    
I've been testing this out in our environment and it will work for our needs. Thanks for the suggestion. – Michael MacDonald Feb 16 '12 at 21:00

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