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I'm testing the perror function in C, and according to this page it prints a default message when a null pointer is passed:

int main(void)
{
    int *p;
    perror(p); //crashes
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Cause int* p contains a random/garbage value.

It is not an NULLpointer. You need to explicitly initialize it with p = NULL;.

Using an uninitialised variable is Undefined behaviour.

main() also needs to return 0;.

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Because p isn't initialized to 0 automatically in C (this isn't Java).

int *p = 0;
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Passing an invalid pointer to perror is undefined behavior.

(C99, 7.1.4p1) "Each of the following statements applies unless explicitly stated otherwise in the detailed descriptions that follow: If an argument to a function has an invalid value (such as a value outside the domain of the function, or a pointer outside the address space of the program, or a null pointer, or a pointer to non-modifiable storage when the corresponding parameter is not const-qualified) or a type (after promotion) not expected by a function with variable number of arguments, the behavior is undefined."

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How do you find the reference source so fast? Thanks! –  Coffee Feb 16 '12 at 17:54
    
How about: 7.19.10.4-2: if s is not a null pointer and the character pointed to by s is not the null character. –  cnicutar Feb 16 '12 at 17:57
    
@cnicutar I would quote 4.p2 that says "Undefined behavior is otherwise indicated in this International Standard by the words "undefined behavior" or by the omission of any explicit definition of behavior.". –  ouah Feb 16 '12 at 18:00
    
@Adel because I read the standard more than one time:) –  ouah Feb 16 '12 at 18:01
1  
Well you could be right. However the standard would usually make it clear "if so on so, the result is not defined". Why did they mention s not being NULL without any mention of UB ? –  cnicutar Feb 16 '12 at 18:02

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