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I was looking at some code and discussing it with co-workers.

Specifically a section of code that looks like this.

    [Test]
    public void TestNormalWay()
    {
        using(var cn = GetConnection())
        {
            cn.Open();
            // do stuff
        }
    }

The question came up:

"why not move the cn.Open into the GetConnection method."

I said that if "Open" throws an exception dispose would not get called. His response was

"So what. The connection wasn't opened so why would it need to get closed (or disposed)?"

For me it is just a matter of not wanting to know if or if not I NEED to dispose/close so I would repeat the cn.Open in the code instead of moving it into the shared function.

BUT it is interesting... so I did some reading at SQL Server Connection Pooling (ADO.NET)

To me it isn't clear if there exists a scenario in which calling cn.Open and it throws and exception where dispose would need to be called.

So in my example below is there any difference really between "TestNormalWay" and "WhyNotDoItThisWay"

    protected static DbConnection GetConnection()
    {
        DbConnection cn = new SqlConnection("SomeConnecitonstring... ");
        return cn; 
    }

    protected static DbConnection GetConnectionDangerousVersion()
    {
        DbConnection cn = new SqlConnection("SomeConnecitonstring... ");
        cn.Open();  // this will throw.. .dispose not called
        return cn; 
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestNormalWay()
    {
        using(var cn = GetConnection())
        {
            cn.Open();
            // do stuff
        }
    }

    [Test]
    public void WhyNotDoItThisWay()
    {
        using(var cn = GetConnectionDangerousVersion())
        {
            // do stuff
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
so based on what you are saying.. and what I am looking at the only way that Dispose will be called in in the WhyNotDoItTHisWay method.. just because you call Open does not automatically Dispose of the connection does this make sense.. wrapping the var cn around the using(){} the cn gets disposed automatically assuming as well that you new up that instance as well.. –  DJ KRAZE Feb 16 '12 at 18:41
    
If you are using a using statement you shouldn't have to dispose of the object yourself. As yours co-workers suspect if an exception happens when attempting to open the connection, the object contains no information to actually dispose of. Furthermore as suggest by Servy you could simply use a try()catch()finally() block if you really wanted to be safe. –  Ramhound Feb 16 '12 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The way you're writing your code you always want to open the connection as soon as it's created so there is no difference.

However you can open and close a connection several times and in code designed to do that there is a big difference.

I might want to write some code where I have a long running routine that takes a connection object and over time opens and closes it. The routine might not care how the connection object was created. Therefore it's an advantage to separate the act of creating the connection with the act of opening and closing it.

With regards the resource management question I'd agree it's not an issue. Creating an SQL connection object in itself doesn't lock any resources, it's the act of opening it that acquires a pooled connection. If the open returns an exception I think it's reasonable to assume that the connection wasn't opened.

share|improve this answer
    
You could also provide both methods. A "GetOpenConnection" and a "GetUnopenedConnection" so that you can do either, but don't need to type as much for the most common case. –  Servy Feb 16 '12 at 18:43
1  
You could, but IMHO it's not a good API design. APIs should be minimal, providing compound methods like this just to reduce typing feels like an ugly way of designing an API to me. But if you want a connection object like that you can write a wrapper. –  James Gaunt Feb 16 '12 at 18:48
    
Agreed. If it was more than just a single short line of code it might be worth discussing, but it's to simple to be worth cluttering the API. Given that the OP started the post in the first place though, apparently this has some value to somebody so I mentioned it anyway. –  Servy Feb 16 '12 at 18:54
    
@JamesGaunt MSDN says "When a SqlConnection object is requested, it is obtained from the pool if a usable connection is available." Is that the act of opening the connection or "new"ing it if I specify the connection string. –  jsobo Feb 16 '12 at 19:40
1  
The article is confusing, because in the third paragraph it says "Whenever a user calls Open on a connection, the pooler looks for an available connection in the pool", which contradicts with the line jsobo found –  Evan M Feb 16 '12 at 19:52

I would be inclined to just return the instance of the SqlConnection without calling Open() in your method. That should be done if and when it is needed. It is not needed in your utility function.

One of the reasons is, there are some objects that require a SqlConnection, but don't necessarily need them to be opened. For instance, a SqlDataAdapter takes a SqlConnection, and handles the opening and closing of it within itself. Sure, you can open a connection before passing it, but then you have to be explicit with closing it.

Taking a few steps back, it should be the responsibility of the calling code to handle what exactly to do with the SqlConnection.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the safest option and since it is ambiguous as to when and if you need to call dispose this will at least ensure it is always called (barring someone pulling the power cord etc...) –  jsobo Feb 16 '12 at 21:43
    
I reread the entire msdn article and found this..."We strongly recommend that you always close the connection when you are finished using it so that the connection will be returned to the pool. You can do this using either the Close or Dispose methods of the Connection object, or by opening all connections inside a using statement in C#"... again another ambiguous statement. It doesn't specify that you actually called open on the connection! Just that you used it. –  jsobo Feb 20 '12 at 12:46

You could put a try/catch around the .Open() call in the second "dangerous" version so that if it does throw an exception while opening you are still disposing the connection.

share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't that dispose the connection before returning it... what would be the point then? –  jsobo Feb 16 '12 at 21:37
    
@jsobo You're correct. Should be try/catch, not try finally. Edited. –  Servy Feb 16 '12 at 21:39

After peaking at the internals of SqlConnection I'm pretty much convinced that it really doesn't matter. A quick test seems to confirm this:

static void Main( string[] args )
{
   Func<SqlConnection> getConnection =
            () =>
               {
                  var connection =
                     new SqlConnection(
                        "Initial Catalog=myDatabase;Server=(local);Username=bogus;password=blah;Connect Timeout=10;" );

                  connection.Open();
                  return connection;
               };

   while(true)
   {
      try
      {
         using( var connection = getConnection() )
         {
            var cmd = new SqlCommand( "SELECT 1", connection ) {CommandType = CommandType.Text};
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
         }
      }
      catch ( Exception )
      {
         // ignore exception
      }
   }
}

I left this code running for a couple of minutes with a profiler attached. Not only is it running quite fast, it's also not leaking any memory. This pretty much convinces me it is ok to open the connection in your GetConnection method.

Of course all other arguments posted here are still valid; you should only open the connection if you're going to use it right away.

share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't necessarily prove anything... what about if the connection open works sometimes but fails others... would that cause a connection pool to be created then resources retrieved and then not disposed of? IE... the open not actually opening but under the covers trying to do a connection reset? –  jsobo Feb 16 '12 at 19:53
    
@jsobo Ok, how would you test for that? I tried different combinations of working and non-working connection strings and different types of errors. As far as I can tell, whenever SqlConnection.Open throws an exception it cleans up any underlying resources. –  Marnix van Valen Feb 16 '12 at 21:29
    
I don't know... there are lots of scenarios you just can't test. The question really is determined by WHEN you get something that must be disposed... at the time of NEW or at the time of OPEN. If you new... and get something from the pool then open does a connection reset to an existing connection and it throws... then you better call dispose... if it does the retrieve from pool and reset under the covers (only upon .Open) and throws then you never got the connection from the pool and wouldn't have to dispose... –  jsobo Feb 16 '12 at 21:40
    
I'm with James Gaunt on this one. Looking at the source code (with reflector) and based on some empirical testing I'd say he's right and creating a connection doesn't claim any resources. Only when you successfully open a connection do you need to close it. –  Marnix van Valen Feb 17 '12 at 8:48

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