Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried to understand what sorted trees are and binary trees and avl and and and ... I'm still not sure, what makes a sorted tree sorted? And what is the complexity (Big-Oh) between searching in a sorted and searching in an unsorted tree? Hope you can help me.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Binary Trees

There exists two main types of binary trees, balanced and unbalanced. A balanced tree aims to keep the height of the tree (height = the amount of nodes between the root and the furthest child) as even as possible. There are several types of algorithms for balanced trees, the two most famous being AVL- and RedBlack-trees. The complexity for insert/delete/search operations on both AVL and RedBlack trees is O(log n) or better - which is the important part. Other self balancing algorithms are AA-, Splay- and Scapegoat-tree.

Balanced trees gain their property (and name) of being balanced from the fact that after every delete or insert operation on the tree the algorithm introspects the tree to make sure it's still balanced, if it's not it will try to fix this (which is done differently with each algorithm) by rotating nodes around in the tree.

Normal (or unbalanced) binary trees do not modify their structure to keep themselves balanced and have the risk of, most often overtime, to become very inefficient (especially if the values are inserted in order). However if performance is of no issue and you mainly want a sorted data structure then they might do. The complexity for insert/delete/search operations on an unbalanced tree range from O(1) (best case - if you want the root) to O(n) (worst-case if you inserted all nodes in order and want the largest node)

There exists another variation which is called a randomized binary tree which uses some kind of randomization to make sure the tree doesn't become fully unbalanced (which is the same as a linked list)

share|improve this answer
add comment

A binary search tree is an "tree"-structure where every node has two children-nodes.
The left nodes all have the property of being less than its parent, and the right-nodes are all greater than its parent.

The intressting thing with an binary-tree is that we can search for an value in O(log n) when the tree is properly sorted. Doing the same search in an LinkedList for an example would give us the searchspeed of O(n).

The best way to go about learning datastructures would be to do a day of googling and reading wikipedia articles.
This might get you started
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_tree

share|improve this answer
add comment

Do a google search for the following:

site:stackoverflow.com binary trees

to get a list of SO questions which will answer your several questions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There isn't really a lot of point in using a tree structure if it isn't sorted in some fashion - if you are planning on searching for a node in the tree and it is unsorted, you will have to traverse the entire tree (O(n)). If you have a tree which is sorted in some fashion, then it is only necessary to traverse down a single branch of the tree (typically O(log n)).

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, binary trees can be used for purposes other than searching and sorting - expression evaluation for example. –  anon May 31 '09 at 9:40
add comment

In binary tree the right leaf is always smaller then the head, and the left leaf is always bigger, so you can search in sorted tree in O(log(n)), you just need to go right if if the key is smaller than head and to the left if bgger

share|improve this answer
add comment

The wikipedia has many entries related to sorted trees. It has also a complete category related to sorting algorithms. You can get very good explanations there.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.