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I have never really done this before so i was hoping that someone could show me the correct what of implementing a override of Except() and GetHashCode() for my class.

I'm trying to modify the class so that i can use the LINQ Except() method.

public class RecommendationDTO{public Guid RecommendationId { get; set; }
public Guid ProfileId { get; set; }
public Guid ReferenceId { get; set; }
public int TypeId { get; set; }
public IList<TagDTO> Tags { get; set; }
public DateTime CreatedOn { get; set; }
public DateTime? ModifiedOn { get; set; }
public bool IsActive { get; set; }
public object ReferencedObject { get; set; }
public bool IsSystemRecommendation { get; set; }
public int VisibilityScore { get; set; }

public RecommendationDTO()
{
}

public RecommendationDTO(Guid recommendationid,
                            Guid profileid,
                            Guid referenceid,
                            int typeid,
                            IList<TagDTO> tags,
                            DateTime createdon,
                            DateTime modifiedon, 
                            bool isactive,
                            object referencedobject)
{
    RecommendationId = recommendationid;
    ProfileId = profileid;
    ReferenceId = referenceid;
    TypeId = typeid;
    Tags = tags;
    CreatedOn = createdon;
    ModifiedOn = modifiedon;
    ReferencedObject = referencedobject;
    IsActive = isactive;
}

public override bool Equals(System.Object obj)
{
    // If parameter is null return false.
    if (obj == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
    RecommendationDTO p = obj as RecommendationDTO;
    if ((System.Object)p == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Return true if the fields match:
    return (ReferenceId == p.ReferenceId);// && (y == p.y);
}

public bool Equals(RecommendationDTO p)
{
    // If parameter is null return false:
    if ((object)p == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Return true if the fields match:
    return (ReferenceId == p.ReferenceId);// && (y == p.y);
}

//public override int GetHashCode()
//{
//    return ReferenceId;// ^ y;
//}}

I have taken a look at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147.aspx but i was hoping someone could show me within my own example.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Joce, Stony, Matthew Strawbridge, IronMan84 Apr 14 '13 at 16:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
On the page you linked to: "It is not a good idea to override operator == in non-immutable types." There are other and better ways to make Except() work. –  Henk Holterman Feb 16 '12 at 19:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can override Equals() and GetHashCode() on your class like this:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    var item = obj as RecommendationDTO;

    if (item == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return this.RecommendationId.Equals(item.RecommendationId);
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.RecommendationId.GetHashCode();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do i not have to implement IEquatable<>?: public class RecommendationDTO : IEquatable<RecommendationDTO>... When i do i get a error: DataTransferObjects.RecommendationDTO does not implement interface member System.IEquatable<DataTransferObjects.RecommendationDTO>.Equals(DataTransferObje‌​cts.RecommendationDTO) –  Nugs Feb 16 '12 at 19:41
    
Thank you very much, i got it working...!! –  Nugs Feb 16 '12 at 19:47
    
@Nugs No problem, cheers! –  Craig Feb 16 '12 at 19:51
public override bool Equals(System.Object obj)
{
    // Check if the object is a RecommendationDTO.
    // The initial null check is unnecessary as the cast will result in null
    // if obj is null to start with.
    var recommendationDTO = obj as RecommendationDTO;

    if (recommendationDTO == null)
    {
        // If it is null then it is not equal to this instance.
        return false;
    }

    // Instances are considered equal if the ReferenceId matches.
    return this.ReferenceId == recommendationDTO.ReferenceId;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    // Returning the hashcode of the Guid used for the reference id will be 
    // sufficient and would only cause a problem if RecommendationDTO objects
    // were stored in a non-generic hash set along side other guid instances
    // which is very unlikely!
    return this.ReferenceId.GetHashCode();
}
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Be careful when using a primary key as your test for equality in overriding Equals() because it only works AFTER the object has been persisted. Prior to that your objects don't have primary keys yet and the IDs of the ones in memory are all zero.

I use base.Equals() if either of the object IDs is zero but there probably is a more robust way.

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