Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

how a code var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : event.keyCode could be explaned? what happens here ? all i understand is that clause returns buttons value to the object charCode. but what those ? and : signs mean? and can i use this thing in other languager? java/c++/php and so on? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
To add on to James answer, you will find this in many other programming languages. I'm fairly sure it's just used to make programmers feel superior. :D – Shaded Feb 16 '12 at 20:08
    
This has to be a duplicate question, right? – Phrogz Feb 16 '12 at 20:08
up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's called the ternary conditional operator. It's basically short for an if...else:

var charCode;
if(evt.which) {
    charCode = evt.which;
}
else {
    charCode = evt.keyCode;
}

Basically, it evaluates the first operand. If that evaluation returns true, the second operand is returned. If false, the third is returned.

As for whether you can use it in other languages, you often can. From the languages you listed, Java and PHP both have it, and I'd be very surprised if C++ didn't (edit - a quick Google reveals that C and C++ do indeed support it too). For more, see Wikipedia.

share|improve this answer

Others correctly pointed out that it is shorthand for:

var charCode;
if(evt.which) {
    charCode = evt.which;
}
else {
    charCode = evt.keyCode;
}

but it is also longhand for:

var charCode = evt.which || evt.keyCode;
share|improve this answer

First, of all, var charCode = starts assignment to local charCode variable. Next, ternary operator is used. It compounds of three parts, condition, what happens if it's true and what happens if it's false.

(evt.which) ? evt.which : event.keyCode
# condition # if true   # if false

In this case, it's used for feature detection (keyboard key event). evt.which is proper way to do it, but in very old browsers you may want to use event.keyCode.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Was very helpful. – Painkiller Feb 16 '12 at 20:37

This is called the conditional operator.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Conditional_Operator

To the left of the ? is the condition. To the right are to results seperated by a :. If the condition is true, the result on the left of the colon is used, otherwise the it's the result on the right.

share|improve this answer
    
@zanlok, did you really suggesting linking to w3schools? I've updated the answer to a more credited site. – Ash Burlaczenko Mar 13 '13 at 16:52
    
quite an acceptable counterpoint, comment removed – zanlok Mar 14 '13 at 20:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.