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I have a single text file with 40,000 records. I need to locate all items greater than October 1st 2011. The format is 01-10-2011 - How can I do this using regular expression?

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Not sure regex is the best way to go here. What OS or language are you using? –  Jonathan M Feb 16 '12 at 20:18
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What language are you doing this in? And why do you want to use a regular expression? –  ruakh Feb 16 '12 at 20:18
    
Regexps are very much the wrong tool for this, as they use the representation of the dates and not the value of them. –  Donal Fellows Feb 16 '12 at 20:21
    
I want to do this using regular expression via Dreamweaver or Notepad++ in Windows. –  user1206919 Feb 16 '12 at 20:22
    
You need to indicate the regular expression and/or programming environment you are using. Regular expressions are not a suitable facility for comparing dates, but we have no way to know which direction to point you unless you specify how you're parsing and handling the records. –  ardnew Feb 16 '12 at 20:22
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1 Answer

It probably shouldn't be done, but it can be done:

([0-3][2-9]|[1-3]1)-10-2011|[0-3][0-9]-1[12]-2011|[0-3][0-9]-[01][0-9]-201[2-9]

This assumes all dates are DD-MM-YYYY and valid, and that you don't need to find dates further in the future than 2019, for which it could be adapted if necessary.

Tested in Dreamweaver CS5, and I doubt they've changed their regex engine much over time. Notepad++ regex doesn't support the bar, which turned out to be rather crippling.

For a breakdown of why this works, we have 3 top level alternatives for matching, separated by the bar (|). The first alternative is:

 ([0-3][2-9]|[1-3][0-9])-10-2011

Which matches any dates in October 2011 with DD not equal to 01. In order to support 02-31 at the character level, a sub bar group, ([0-3][2-9]|[1-3]1) is necessary. The left hand side of this bar matches 02-39, omitting 11, 21, and 31, and the right hand side accepts precisely those omissions.

The next top level alternative is:

[0-3][0-9]-1[12]-2011

Which matches any day in the months of November and December of 2011.

And the final group is:

[0-3][0-9]-[01][0-9]-201[2-9]

Which matches any day of any month in 2012-2019.

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([0-9]{2}-[1][0-2]-2011|[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}-201[2-9]) –  user1206919 Feb 16 '12 at 20:52
    
This is what I got collaborated with an internal person. Thank you all! All dates are in a valid format, but the raw data file can not be worked with in any other way. I know its a challenge with out seeing what I have. But thank you! –  user1206919 Feb 16 '12 at 20:54
    
We were posting at the same time! Thank you!! –  user1206919 Feb 16 '12 at 20:55
    
@user1206919 Ah no probs. Your regex does accept 01-10-2011 though - making it not accept October 1st was the hardest part! Glad the problem is sorted anyway. –  Paul Calcraft Feb 16 '12 at 20:59
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