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I have a javascript file with classes which contain method functions. I was wondering how to go about calling a class instance method from an onClick event.

function MyClass()
{
    this.instanceData = "Display Me";

    this.DisplayData = function()
    {
        document.write(this.instanceData);
    }
}

var classInstance = new MyClass();

How would I call the DisplayData function on classInstance from an onClick event. For example:

<button onClick="classInstance.DisplayData()">Click Me!</button>

Which doesn't work, but helps me clarify what I'm looking to do. Any suggestions?

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If you want to do it right, and avoid causing a mess, don't use inline event handlers (onclick and friends). They just don't belong in your HTML. Learn about addEventListener() and all your code will become much cleaner and manageable. –  kapa Feb 17 '12 at 8:55

2 Answers 2

http://jsfiddle.net/EyMCQ/1/

As you notice, this does not work, because the var you've declared, stays in the scope of the executing block. If you remove the var, it'll work, because classInstance is now in the global scope.

function MyClass() {
    this.instanceData = "Display Me";

    this.DisplayData = function() {
        alert(this.instanceData);
    }
}

classInstance = new MyClass();​

and call it like this:

<button onClick="classInstance.DisplayData.call(classInstance)">Click Me!</button>​

http://jsfiddle.net/EyMCQ/2/

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2  
Declaring classInstance without the var keyword doesn't work. Unless you were talking about using a global function to display the text, which I don't want to do. It has to be from a class instance so the project can still be easily manageable when it grows to a larger scale. –  James Woods Feb 16 '12 at 22:21
    
In that case, you might want to take a look at using a javascript library to help you attach events by querying the dom and assigning behavior from within the class. The code block you'd written is fine for playing around in JavaScript, but it's good practice to separate out behavior logic from the layout (MVC). So, if you were to use jQuery as a library, you'd add a class to your element being clicked, query it using <pre>$('.myClass').click(function() { alert('hello');});</pre> –  sankargorthi Feb 16 '12 at 22:55
    
There are multiple problems with this answer: 1. You're advocating relying on The Horror of Implicit Globals‌​, which is always a bad idea. If you want to create a global, do it explicitly (window.classInstance = ...). 2. There's absolutely no reason for classInstance.DisplayData.call(classInstance); it's exactly the same as classInstance.DisplayData(). 3. It doesn't address the fact that the OP's code uses document.write, which won't work (the way they want it to) after the page loads. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 17 '12 at 9:08
    
I do not advocate putting variables in the global scope. I was under the assumption that this was a learning exercise. A w3schools type example problem. The call method was just me playing around because I was bored. Document.write, well I didn't want to use it in my example. That was all. Nothing sinister or incompetent intended. Kindly do not assume so. –  sankargorthi Feb 17 '12 at 15:42

Your code works just fine assuming it's at global scope, except that you can't use document.write after the page is loaded. So:

function MyClass()
{
    this.instanceData = "Display Me";

    this.DisplayData = function()
    {
        alert(this.instanceData); // <=== only change here
    }
}

var classInstance = new MyClass();

...works fine with your onclick attribute. Live example | source

document.write is primarily for use during the page load. If you call it after page load, it implies a document.open which wipes out the current document and replaces it with the content you write. If you want to append to the page after page load, use createElement and appendChild, setting the content of the element via innerHTML. For instance:

var p = document.createElement('p');
p.innerHTML = "Hi there";
document.body.appendChild(p);

...appends a paragraph containing "Hi there" to the page.

However, I urge you not to use onclick attributes and such, not least because they require access to global variables and functions, and I advocate avoiding having global variables and functions to the extent you can (and you can almost completely avoid them). Instead, use modern methods of hooking up event handlers: addEventListener and (to support IE8 and earlier) attachEvent.

So changing your example so that it doesn't create any globals:

(function() {
    function MyClass()
    {
        this.instanceData = "Display Me";

        this.DisplayData = function()
        {
            alert(this.instanceData);
        }
    }

    var classInstance = new MyClass();

    // ...and hook it up
    var button = document.getElementById("theButton");
    if (button.addEventListener) {
        button.addEventListener('click', function() {
            classInstance.DisplayData();
        }, false);
    }
    else if (button.attachEvent) {
        button.attachEvent('onclick', function() {
            classInstance.DisplayData();
        });
    }
    else {
        // Very old browser, complain
    }
})();

(Note that the event name is "click" with addEventListener, "onclick" with attachEvent.)

That assumes the button looks like this:

<button id="theButton">Click Me!</button>

...and that your code runs after the button has already been put on the page (e.g., your script is at the bottom of the page or runs in response to some event).

Now, it's a pain to check whether to use addEventListener or attachEvent every single time. Also, you may not want every element you need to work with to have an id. This is where using a good JavaScript library like jQuery, Prototype, YUI, Closure, or any of several others is useful. They smooth over the event stuff (and many other idiosyncrasies) for you, and provide useful features for locating elements in ways other than by id (in many cases, supporting nearly all CSS-style selectors, even on older browsers that don't have querySelector / querySelectorAll built in.

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