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Is there any way I can iterate backwards (in reverse) through a SortedDictionary in c#?

Or is there a way to define the SortedDictionary in descending order to begin with?

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Dont you mean Dictionary... –  mP. May 31 '09 at 12:08
    
Yes, I think so ;-) –  Dario May 31 '09 at 12:09
3  
Typo...Thanks for all the human compilers :-) –  Gal Goldman May 31 '09 at 12:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The SortedDictionary itself doesn't support backward iteration, but you have several possibilities to achieve the same effect.

  1. Use .Reverse-Method (Linq). (This will have to pre-compute the whole dictionary output but is the simplest solution)

    var Rand = new Random();
    
    
    var Dict = new SortedDictionary<int, string>();
    
    
    for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) {
        var newItem = Rand.Next(1, 100);
        Dict.Add(newItem, (newItem * newItem).ToString());
    }
    
    
    foreach (var x in Dict.Reverse()) {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", x.Key, x.Value);
    }
    
  2. Make the dictionary sort in descending order.

    class DescendingComparer<T> : IComparer<T> where T : IComparable<T> {
        public int Compare(T x, T y) {
            return y.CompareTo(x);
        }
    }
    
    
    // ...
    
    
    var Dict = new SortedDictionary<int, string>(new DescendingComparer<int>());
    
  3. Use SortedList<TKey, TValue> instead. The performance is not as good as the dictionary's (O(n) instead of O(logn)), but you have random-access at the elements like in arrays. When you use the generic IDictionary-Interface, you won't have to change the rest of your code.

Edit :: Iterating on SortedLists

You just access the elements by index!

var Rand = new Random();


var Dict = new SortedList<int, string>();

for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) {
    var newItem = Rand.Next(1, 100);
    Dict.Add(newItem, (newItem * newItem).ToString());
}

// Reverse for loop (forr + tab)
for (int i = Dict.Count - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
    Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", Dict.Keys[i], Dict.Values[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was really helpful! –  Gal Goldman May 31 '09 at 12:51

The easiest way to define the SortedDictionary in the reverse order to start with is to provide it with an IComparer<TKey> which sorts in the reverse order to normal.

Here's some code from MiscUtil which might make that easier for you:

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace MiscUtil.Collections
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Implementation of IComparer{T} based on another one;
    /// this simply reverses the original comparison.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    public sealed class ReverseComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
    {
        readonly IComparer<T> originalComparer;

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the original comparer; this can be useful
        /// to avoid multiple reversals.
        /// </summary>
        public IComparer<T> OriginalComparer
        {
            get { return originalComparer; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a new reversing comparer.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="original">The original comparer to 
        /// use for comparisons.</param>
        public ReverseComparer(IComparer<T> original)
        {
            if (original == null)
            { 
                throw new ArgumentNullException("original");
            }
            this.originalComparer = original;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the result of comparing the specified
        /// values using the original
        /// comparer, but reversing the order of comparison.
        /// </summary>
        public int Compare(T x, T y)
        {
            return originalComparer.Compare(y, x);
        }
    }
}

You'd then use:

var dict = new SortedDictionary<string, int>
     (new ReverseComparer<string>(StringComparer.InvariantCulture));

(or whatever type you were using).

If you only ever want to iterate in one direction, this will be more efficient than reversing the ordering afterwards.

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It would be quite useful to provide a framework-integrated casting method from Comparison<T> to Comparer<T> since the delegate is much easier to handle (lambda method) ;-) –  Dario May 31 '09 at 12:11
    
I've got a class in MiscUtil for that as well :) –  Jon Skeet May 31 '09 at 12:30
    
Nice ;-) Should be part of the framework anyway. There is even such a class internally but it's held private ;-) –  Dario May 31 '09 at 12:39

There is also a very simple approach if you are dealing with numeric values as the key which is to simply negate them when you create the dictionary.

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If you're using .NET 3.5, you can use the OrderByDescending extension method:

        var dictionary = new SortedDictionary<int, string>();
        dictionary.Add(1, "One");
        dictionary.Add(3, "Three");
        dictionary.Add(2, "Two");
        dictionary.Add(4, "Four");



        var q = dictionary.OrderByDescending(kvp => kvp.Key);
        foreach (var item in q)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item.Key + " , " + item.Value);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
That's bad!! OrderByDescending needs O(nlogn) time to sort data which have already been sorted! –  Dario May 31 '09 at 12:13
    
Good point, I'm so used to using Linq for everything. –  BFree May 31 '09 at 12:18

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