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I have written a small Expect script to log into a Cisco device; once logged in I want to repeatedly run a command and grep the output.

#!/usr/bin/expect

send_user "Device name: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set host $expect_out(1,string)

send_user "Username: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set user $expect_out(1,string)

stty -echo
send_user -- "Password: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set pass $expect_out(1,string)
stty echo

send_user "show int "
expect_user  -re "(.*)\n"
set intf $expect_out(1,string)
send_user "\n"

spawn telnet $host
expect "Username:"
send "$user\r"
expect "Password:"
send "$pass\r"
expect ">"

At this point we have logged into the device, I want to execute the command "show int xxx" repeatedly and grep the output for a specific line. grep isn't in Expect, nor a command like sleep, so I can loop round executing the show int command, grepping out my specific line. How can I mix Expect and Bash like this?

UPDATE: I've pretty much done the script now, I'll post the full script once I get over this last hurdle. A line set bytesnow [exec grep "packets input" \< showint | cut -d \ -f 9] is throwing the error;

child process exited abnormally
   while executing
"exec grep "packets input" < \showint | cut -d \  -f 9"

But it works fine in a test script I wrote. The file ./showint is there, running that command on the command line works fine? I can't work out what's wrong?

UPDATE: More investigation (http://wiki.tcl.tk/8489) has shown me that the grep exits with status code 1, which means no pattern matches were found, put the command works just fine from the command line? Even with /full/path/to/showint.

END: I fixed my mistake by realising what a fool I had been, answered below. Thanks all for your help :D

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Hah! Typo, corrected, cheers ;) –  jwbensley Feb 16 '12 at 23:42
    
Well it looks like you're looking for field 9 in the router#sh int <int> | i packets input field with a space as a delimiter. I only see 8 fields in my output. Can you tell us what you're trying to accomplish? 798518177 packets input, 60933723489 bytes, 0 no buffer –  resmon6 Feb 17 '12 at 0:24
    
I used "-f 9" because that line of output on a switch/router has several spaces at the beginning, to indent the line. I am trying to work my way along to the bytes value of that line of output. See my answer at the bottom. Thanks :) –  jwbensley Feb 17 '12 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

This is what I would do

log_user 0
while(1) {
  send -- "sh int $intf | i packets input\r"
  set timeout 5
  expect {
    -re "^ +(\d+) packets" { send_user -- "$expect_out(1,string)" }
    timeout { send_user "broke?\n" }
  }
}

That'll get you the number of packets input.

share|improve this answer
    
Whilst that is a really cool idea which I do like very much, my script's purpose (which I didn't explain prior, so thats my fault) is to get the current throughput of an interface. See my answer below for the complete script. Thanks for your great idea though :D –  jwbensley Feb 17 '12 at 0:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is my first Expect script, its purpose is to give the live (almost, 1 second!) throughput of an interface. The below example gives an interface input speed, because we grep for the line containing "packets input". Change this to "packets output" to get a live output rate for that interface.

#!/usr/bin/expect

# Long delay for those tricky hostnames

set timeout 60

# Prompt user for device name/IP, username, password, 
# and interface to query (gi0/2)

send_user "Device name: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set host $expect_out(1,string)

send_user "Username: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set user $expect_out(1,string)

stty -echo
send_user "Password: "
expect_user -re "(.*)\n"
set pass $expect_out(1,string)
send_user "\n"
stty echo

send_user "show int "
expect_user  -re "(.*)\n"
set intf $expect_out(1,string)
send_user "\n"

spawn telnet $host
expect "Username:"
send "$user\r"
expect "Password:"
send "$pass\r"
expect ">"

set byteslast 0
set bytesnow 0

log_user 0

# Enter a continuous loop grabbing the number of bytes that
# have passed through an interface, each second.
# The different in this number each cycle, is essentially
# how much traffic this interface is pushing.

while { true } {
  send "show int $intf\r"
  expect ">"

  set showint [open "showint" "w"]
  puts $showint $expect_out(buffer)
  close $showint

  set bytesnow [exec grep "packets input" \< showint | cut -d \  -f 9]

  if { $bytesnow > $byteslast } {
    set diff [expr $bytesnow - $byteslast]
    set bps [exec expr "$diff" \* 8]
    set kbps [exec expr "$bps" \/ 1000]
  } elseif { $bytesnow < $byteslast } {
    set diff [expr $byteslast - $bytesnow]
    set bps [exec expr "$diff" \* 8]
    set kbps [exec expr "$bps" \/ 1000]
  } elseif { $bytesnow == $byteslast } {
    set kbps 0
  }

  set byteslast $bytesnow
  puts "$kbps Kbps\r"

  sleep 1
}

As this is my first Expect script, I have no doubt it could be written more efficiently and clearly (that always the case I find), so if anyone has any pointers on this one I'm all ears! :)

My problem with my exec grep command turned out to be that prior to that, the file I had opened "showint", I hadn't closed, and I was trying to access another file; school boy mistake!

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1  
If you want to keep everything in expect you can use the TCL command regexp for your grep. I believe your command would be [regexp { \(\d+\) bytes} $showint bytesnow]. Also, your [exec expr lines unnecessarily call out to the shell command expr when you can use the built-in TCL expr command. Just get rid of the exec in those commands. –  resmon6 Feb 17 '12 at 4:13
    
Also, a more elegant long term solution is to use snmp. Have you checked out MRTG or NMIS? –  resmon6 Feb 17 '12 at 14:52
    
I have SNMP for overall monitoring but I needed this script for troubleshooting, when I want to see the interface traffic right now, and not in five minutes when the poller runs :) –  jwbensley Feb 17 '12 at 16:16

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