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My code:

use strict;  
use warnings;

my $seq = "ATGGT[TGA]G[TA]GC";  
print "The sequences is $seq\n";  
my %regex = (  
   AG => "R",  
   TC => "Y",  
   GT => "K",  
   AC => "M",  
   GC => "S",  
   AT => "M",  
   CGT => "B",  
   TGA => "D",  
   ACT => "H",  
   ACG => "V",  
   ACGT => "N"  
);  

$seq =~ s/\[(\w+)\]/$regex{$1}/g;  
print "$seq\n";  

My ideal output is: ATGGTDGMGC But in the above scenario, since my hash key is AT and not TA, it doesn't run. One way to solve this problem would be adding another key-value: TA => "M". But I cannot do this for all key-value pairs, as there are too many possibilities.

So is there a better way to address this issue??

Thanks..

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1  
Too many possibilities? Not in this example. The bracketed strings could be long I take it? Is there an algorithm that describes how the keys map to equivalance classes (in your example AT and TA are in the same equivalance class). If order doesn't matter, you can sort the elements before lookup. Or if reversal doesn't matter, you can conditionally reverse based on lexical order of the resulting string. You haven't given enough information to tell us why you don't need an exhaustive dictionary covering all possibilities. –  Liudvikas Bukys Feb 16 '12 at 21:46
    
@Liudvikas Bukys, With the data given, the OP would have to add 54 elements to the existing 11. 5x more redundant data than actual data is definitely too many possibilities. I suppose the permutations could be generated mechanically, but if things are to be done mechanically, it's simpler just to sort each key. –  ikegami Feb 16 '12 at 23:32
    
Like @ikegami said this has many possibilities and that's why I didn't want to use an exhaustive dictionary covering all possibilities. –  Jordan Feb 17 '12 at 5:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing you mean that the order of the stuff in brackets is unimportant, so AT is equivalent to TA, and TAG equivalent to TGA, etc.

[ Note that the other Eric made a different guess. You weren't very clear on what you wanted. ]

You could sort the letters.

sub key { join '', sort split //, $_[0] }

my @subs = (
   AG => "R",
   TC => "Y",
   GT => "K",
   AC => "M",
   GC => "S",
   AT => "M",
   CGT => "B",
   TGA => "D",
   ACT => "H",
   ACG => "V",
   ACGT => "N",
);  

my %subs;
while (@subs) {
    my $key = shift(@subs);
    my $val = shift(@subs);
    $subs{ key($key) } = $val;
}

# Die on unrecognized
$seq =~ s/\[(\w+)\]/ $subs{ key($1) } or die $1 /ge;

or

# Do nothing on unrecognized
$seq =~ s/\[(\w+)\]/ $subs{ key($1) } || $1 /ge;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes.. the order in the brackets does not matter. And your idea was simple and worked for me. Thanks for the tip!! –  Jordan Feb 17 '12 at 4:59
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Perl has no way of knowing that the key AT means the same thing as TA unless you tell it in some way. If all of your sequences can be reversed, then you could do something like:

for (keys %regex) {
   $regex{reverse $_} = $regex{$_}
}

You probably should also check to make sure you are not overwriting any existing keys.

Alternatively, you could modify the regex:

$seq =~ s/\[(\w+)\]/$regex{$1} or $regex{reverse $1}
        or die "pattern $1 not found"/ge;  

Again both of these examples assume that all of your keys can be reversed. If not, then you will have to either enter the reversals manually, or develop some sort of selection criteria for reversal.

share|improve this answer
    
The keys can be reversed and that's not the only case. It can also be jumbled. Like ACT, ATC, TCA etc.. The sorting idea was good for my example. I should have been more clear. Sorry about that. –  Jordan Feb 17 '12 at 5:10
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