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I am looking over someone Else's code and noticed that some of the user control items have Class.Designer.cs and Class.resx files while others only have the .resx file. Is there a way I can add a .cs file to the controls with only a .resx file?

Why/how would this occur?

Is there any difference between the two? It looks like designer code is in the Designer.cs file while the UC with only has .rexs has all the code in a single .cs file.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
The difference is that UCs without the Designer.cs file where created in VS2003. A version that supported C# before the partial keyword became available. Not sure why you are fretting over this, create your own controls instead. –  Hans Passant Feb 17 '12 at 1:03
    
@HansPassant Yes, I am well aware I can create my own controls. As mentioned, I am looking over another's code and modifying it. I like the two file format so I was wondering if there was a way to "convert" the older UC to the two file format. Thanks for the note about VS2003. –  john Feb 17 '12 at 16:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some people automatically delete the Class.Designer.cs file when creating User Controls and Forms. If they do this, then the code to manage the placement of controls on the Form and such are not longer separated into a partial class, but are instead included into the code behind of the Class.cs file.

For example here is Form 1.designer.cs.

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    partial class Form1
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Windows Form Designer generated code

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.panel1 = new System.Windows.Forms.Panel();
            this.SuspendLayout();
            // 
            // panel1
            // 
            this.panel1.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(49, 87);
            this.panel1.Name = "panel1";
            this.panel1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(200, 100);
            this.panel1.TabIndex = 0;
            // 
            // Form1
            // 
            this.AutoScaleDimensions = new System.Drawing.SizeF(6F, 13F);
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(284, 262);
            this.Controls.Add(this.panel1);
            this.Name = "Form1";
            this.Text = "Form1";
            this.ResumeLayout(false);

        }

        #endregion

        private System.Windows.Forms.Panel panel1;
    }
}

If I create another form, but delete the designer file, you will see this sort of code will go into the Form1.cs code file instead:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private Panel panel1;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.panel1 = new System.Windows.Forms.Panel();
            this.SuspendLayout();
            // 
            // panel1
            // 
            this.panel1.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(101, 62);
            this.panel1.Name = "panel1";
            this.panel1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(200, 100);
            this.panel1.TabIndex = 0;
            // 
            // Form1
            // 
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(284, 262);
            this.Controls.Add(this.panel1);
            this.Name = "Form1";
            this.ResumeLayout(false);

        }
    }
}

This doesn't cause any harm, however having the code that deals with the form controls in a different file keeps your code looking leaner and cleaner and is therefore easier to navigate and manage.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree. It looks much cleaner with partial classes. Can this be undone (i.e. add the file back somehow)? –  john Feb 16 '12 at 22:00
2  
Yes, you can add a partial class with the name Form.Designer.cs and VS 2010 will nest that under the Form1 control. You could then move any methods / design implementation from your code behind back into that file. –  dscammell Feb 17 '12 at 10:26

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