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The following code will give me an error, since boost::mutex is noncopyable, while xyz.push_back() is a copy constructor.

class XYZ
{
    public:
        double x;
        boost::mutex x_mutex;
}

vector<XYZ> xyz;
xyz.push_back(XYZ());

So I tried something like this,

class XYZ
{
    public:
        double x;
        boost::mutex * x_mutex;
}

vector<XYZ> xyz;
xyz.push_back(XYZ());

It complies with no error, but the question is "will that mutex actually work as it should be?" Is this a good way to encapsulate a mutex inside a class, and then create a vector of that class?

Thanks.

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2  
Whether 'it' works depends on if you use the mutex correctly. But one thing is for sure: if you don't understand what's going on with your mutexes and/or mutex pointers, you're probably in some trouble. –  Michael Burr Feb 16 '12 at 23:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are two issues here:

  1. Will the mutex be created correctly?

  2. Will the mutex be used correctly?

As the question stands the answer to 1. is NO. The mutex pointer is not pointing to a mutex.

So you'll need to do to add an appropriate constructor. And since you need a constructor you'll probably need to implement a destructor, copy constructor and assignment operator if you want your class to behave correctly.

Either

XYZ::XYZ() : x(0), x_mutex(new boost::mutex) {}
XYZ::~XYZ() { delete x_mutex; }
XYZ::XYZ( const XYZ & xyz ) : x(xyz.x), x_mutex( new boost::mutex ) {}
XYZ& XYZ::operator=( const XYZ & xyz ) { x=xyz.x; }

or

explicit XYZ::XYZ( boost::mutex * m ) : x(0), x_mutex(m) {}
// Strictly speaking we dont need these as the default version does the right thing.
XYZ::~XYZ() {}
XYZ::XYZ( const XYZ & xyz ) : x(xyz.x), x_mutex( xyz.x_mutex ) {}
XYZ& XYZ::operator=( const XYZ & xyz ) { x=xyz.x; x_mutex = xyz.x_mutex; }

Would be what I'd expect.

In the first case each instance and copy of the object has its own mutex. In the second each object shares a mutex with its copies, but the mutex must be created before the instances.

There is a third variant where the mutex can be created by the constructor and shared with all the instances, but to do this you hold a shared_ptr to the mutex instead of a raw pointer.

class XYZ
{
  public:
    double x;
    boost::shared_ptr<boost::mutex> x_mutex;
    XYZ() : x(0), x_mutex( new boost::mutex ) {}
    // Default versions of the other three do the right thing.
};

If we go down any of these paths we end up in a situation where the mutex is correctly created and initialised.

Now for the tricky part "Will the mutex be used correctly?". To answer this we need to know how the objects are shared between threads, what is the shared data the mutex is supposed to be protecting.

If the vector of objects is created in the main thread before any worker threads are created, and each object instance is getting modified by worker threads ( so that the mutex really is protecting the x data) then the first version if probably correct. In this case your code looks more like this.

//Main thread
std::vector<XYZ> v;
for(unsigned int i=0; i<10; ++i)
  v.push_back(XYZ());

//Several worker threads like this
j = rand()%10;
v[j].x_mutex->lock();
v[j].x+=1;
v[j].x_mutex->unlock();

If x is really a pointer type and the thing it is pointing to is shared between threads then your code probably looks like this, and the correct version of the code to use is 2 or 3.

//Main thread
std::vector<XYZ> v;
X * xa;
boost::mutex xa_mutex;
X * xb;
boost::mutex xb_mutex;

for(unsigned int i=0; i<5; ++i)
  v.push_back(XYZ(xa,xa_mutex));

for(unsigned int i=0; i<5; ++i)
  v.push_back(XYZ(xb,xb_mutex));

//Several worker threads like this
j = rand()%10;
v[j].x_mutex->lock(); 
v[j].x->do_something();
v[j].x_mutex->unlock();

The key being that there is one mutex per shared resource.

Note that technically the vector v is a shared resource in both cases, and should also be protected by a mutex if it is going to be changed after creation. However such a lock would (correctly) destroy all parallelism .. so lets ignore that for now ;)

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Thank you Michael, I managed to make it work using shared pointer. –  2607 Feb 21 '12 at 3:31

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