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How can I enforce that all Cars should have Tyres of a specific type? I am using Java 1.3 (for mobile) so unable to use generics.

abstract class Car{

    private Tyre[] tyres;

    protected Car(){
        tyres = createTyres();
    }

    protected abstract Tyre[] createTyres(); 

    public Tyre[] getTyres(){
        return tyres;
    }
}

abstract class Tyre{}

//Concrete classes
class SlickTyre extends Tyre{}

class RacingCar extends Car {
    public RacingCar(){
    }
    protected SlickTyre[] createTyres(){
        return new SlickTyre[]{};
    }
    public SlickTyre[] getTyres(){
        //this won't compile as it overrides the parent return type     
    }
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Why do you want to return SlickTyre? Normally, your RacingCar class would just return Tyre, as would FourByFour and Compact, but reading the TreadDepth property of the Tyre returned by RacingCar would return 0. –  Martin James Feb 16 '12 at 23:21
    
Nice thinking but SlickTyre has some extra properties like operatingTemperature which don't sit nicely inside Tyre –  donturner Feb 16 '12 at 23:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, covariant return type was added to java only from java5. Older version [such as 1.3] require no variance return type.

You can read more about it in this article

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+1 In other words the example compiles with Java 1.5+ –  Fabian Barney Feb 16 '12 at 23:30

If SlickTyre has extra properties/functions then other Tyre, you might have broke the LSP principle.

If you are working on J2ME (you mentioned mobile), the general practice is to avoid abstraction if not necessary, these extra overhead might impacts on jar size and performance. Well, we practice that 5 years ago when phones requires jar file to be less than 64kb.

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1  
Good point. I don't think I'm violating LSP since SlickTyre merely adds properties and does not define any new behaviour which would affect the behaviour of the super class. The more I read though, the more I am thinking that inheritance has a strictly limited scope, and in this case a Tyre interface might be more appropriate. –  donturner Feb 19 '12 at 11:38

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