Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

When adding event listeners and defining their corresponding functions I find myself defining the function in the code of a constructor a lot. Something like this:

package
    {
        public class stuff extends Sprite
        {
            public function stuff()
            {
                minimizeBtn.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, minimizeOnClick);
                function minimizeOnClick(e:MouseEvent):void
                {
                       //do minimization stuff here
                }
            }
        }
    }

However, there is clearly another option to define it like any other method of the class. Something like this:

 package
    {
        public class stuff extends Sprite
        {
            public function stuff()
            {
                minimizeBtn.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, minimizeOnClick);
            }

            internal function minimizeOnClick(e:MouseEvent):void
            {
                //do minimization stuff here
            }
        }
    }

The second option may not really make sense because the function isn't really a method of the class. But my concern is that the first method will use up extra memory for each instance of the class. Which is the most efficient and correct way to do this and also does the first method take up extra memory or CPU time for each instance of the class?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Ideally you would want to have the constructor as simple as possible (if you need to do a lot of things call an init() private method you define) and having the listener(minimizeOnClick) as a private function is the simplest solution in my opinion –  George Profenza Feb 16 '12 at 23:47
    
Thanks George. I've seen other people say keep the constructor simple as well. Is there a reason for this other than code readability? Using an init function just adds more overhead (only a few CPU cycles so its almost nothing, but still). Do constructors in AS do something significantly different than C or Java constructors? –  Josh Brittain Feb 16 '12 at 23:53
    
According to Joa Ebert in ActionScript 3 optimization techniques "Code inside the constructor is not optimized by the Just-in-time compiler (JIT). To use JIT optimized code there is the possibility to call a function out of the constructor. The code inside that function is then optimized again.". In short the Actionscript Virtual Machine(AVM) works differently than C/Java –  George Profenza Feb 16 '12 at 23:58
    
Good to know. Thanks for the tip! –  Josh Brittain Feb 17 '12 at 0:06
2  
As stated above constructors should have minimal code in it usually just one line calling an init stle function. Nesting functions in my opinion should never be used it can create a plethora of issues such as losing scope. I would suggest you grab flexPMD and run it on somed of your files. It will keep you in check with standard coding practices. opensource.adobe.com/wiki/display/flexpmd/… –  The_asMan Feb 17 '12 at 0:15

1 Answer 1

The latter example is the correct way, and it's true that you should try encapsulate your addEventListener() and listening function within the relevant class. In your case, you may want to consider making a class for your minimizeBtn:

public class MinimizeButton extends SimpleButton
{

    public function MinimizeButton()
    {
        addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, _onClick);
    }

    private function _onClick(e:MouseEvent):void
    {
        // do minimization stuff here
    }

}

MinimizeButton's _onClick() should then target the relevant instance of your class stuff and run whatever stuff needs to do from there.

This example's process is more like:

MinimizeButton: "I've been clicked, I should inform stuff so it can do something relevant."

Rather than:

stuff: "I'm going to sit and wait for MinimizeButton to get clicked, then I'll do what's required."

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.