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So I want to count how many time the function moveSingleDisk() is called, but I can't seem to figure it out... Using this code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void moveTower(int n, char start, char finish, char temp, int count);
void moveSingleDisk(char moveFrom, char moveTo, int count);
void calcHanoi(int n);

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    calcHanoi(5);
    return 0;
}

void calcHanoi(int n)
{
    int count = 0;
    moveTower(n, 'A', 'B', 'C', count);
}

void moveTower(int n, char start, char finish, char temp, int count)
{
    if (n == 1) 
    {
        count++;
        moveSingleDisk(start, finish, count);
        return;
    }
    moveTower(n-1, start, temp, finish, count);
    count++;
    moveSingleDisk(start, finish, count);
    moveTower(n-1, temp, finish, start, count);
}

void moveSingleDisk(char moveFrom, char moveTo, int count)
{
    cout << count << ": " << moveFrom << " -> " << moveTo << endl;
}

I get the following output:

1: A -> B
1: A -> C
2: B -> C
1: A -> B
2: C -> A
2: C -> B
3: A -> B
1: A -> C
2: B -> C
2: B -> A
3: C -> A
2: B -> C
3: A -> B
3: A -> C
4: B -> C
1: A -> B
2: C -> A
2: C -> B
3: A -> B
2: C -> A
3: B -> C
3: B -> A
4: C -> A
2: C -> B
3: A -> B
3: A -> C
4: B -> C
3: A -> B
4: C -> A
4: C -> B
5: A -> B

I've tried to trace the problem, but recursion makes tracing this type of thing quite difficult (at least for me).

Any help or explanation would be greatly appreciated! Thank you :)

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2  
Why don't you just use a static variable? Or if you want to keep the basics of your code then don't pass count by value but by reference or as a pointer. – PeterT Feb 16 '12 at 23:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're passing count by value, so the recursive calls to moveTower don't modify the local copy of it. Pass by reference instead:

void moveTower(int n, char start, char finish, char temp, int & count)
                                                              ^

It might be slightly neater to increment the counter inside moveSingleDisk, rather than before each call to it, so you can be sure that you don't miss any calls. In that case, you'll need to pass by reference there too.

share|improve this answer
    
Eh, such a beginner mistake :P Thanks Mike. – Jarrod Feb 16 '12 at 23:43

if you simply need count calls of moveSingleDisk, just make in the moveSingleDisk

static int count = 0;
count++;

look at this example, you don't need to pass counter parameter

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int f(){
  static int i = 0;
  cout << i++;
  return i < 5 ? f() : 5;
}

int main(){
  f();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is cleaner, tbh, as it emphasizes the idea that the counter pertains specifically to the moveSingleDisk function and is state for that function. – Karl Knechtel Feb 17 '12 at 2:37

Working with recursive data/algorithms, a functional approach can simplify the code: return the count from your recursive functions, 'aggregating' the nested levels. But this way you will lose the display of the 'step' count.

int moveTower(int n, char start, char finish, char temp);
int moveSingleDisk(char moveFrom, char moveTo);
void calcHanoi(int n);

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    calcHanoi(5);
    return 0;
}

void calcHanoi(int n)
{
    int count = moveTower(n, 'A', 'B', 'C');
}

int moveTower(int n, char start, char finish, char temp)
{
    if (n == 1) 
        return moveSingleDisk(start, finish);
    return
        moveTower(n-1, start, temp, finish) +
        moveSingleDisk(start, finish) +
        moveTower(n-1, temp, finish, start);
}

int moveSingleDisk(char moveFrom, char moveTo)
{
    cout << moveFrom << " -> " << moveTo << endl;
    return 1;
}
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