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I understand that something is wrong with type convertations, from my perspective this is really weard:

months is NSArray so I have no items there: months.count == 0

this doesn't work like it should appears 0 < 0 -1 is true?

(0 < months.count -1) == true

but this works fine

(0 < (int)months.count -1) == false

Don't get why?

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Is it fair to simplify your examples to: 0 < 0-1 == true and 0 < 0-1 == false ? –  sarnold Feb 17 '12 at 0:03
    
@sarnold - actually, I think not... as 0-1 is signed, and months.count -1 is unsigned –  MByD Feb 17 '12 at 0:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

count returns NSUInteger, which is unsigned, so months.count -1 is an unsigned expression and is evaluated to positive number, and therefore bigger than 0.

when you cast it to int, the expression (int)months.count -1 is evaluated as signed, and therefore equals to -1, which is smaller than 0.

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ok this means, (unsigned)0 - (int)1 == (unsigned)0 but then why (signed)0 < (unsigned)0 is true? –  Igor R. Feb 17 '12 at 0:07
    
no, why would it be so? where did == come from. –  MByD Feb 17 '12 at 0:08
    
(signed)0 < (unsigned)0 is not true, (signed)0 < (unsigned)0 - 1 is true. they are totaly different expressions. –  MByD Feb 17 '12 at 0:09
    
from my understanding, compiler should count right part and left part. in the end it should be like (signed) 0 vs (unsigned)0 –  Igor R. Feb 17 '12 at 0:10
    
You forget the -1 it has precedence over <. see swansontec.com/sopc.html –  MByD Feb 17 '12 at 0:12

From the NSArray documentation, we can see that the count method returns a NSUInteger, which is an unsigned integer. By subtracting 1 from an unsigned 0, we end up with the largest possible unsigned integer you can actually get.

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same thing, why then (signed)0 < (unsigned)0 ? –  Igor R. Feb 17 '12 at 0:11
    
@IgorR.: It isn't. 0 == 0, regardless of types. –  Peter Hosey Feb 17 '12 at 1:03

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