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Pretty simple idea, but I'm not sure the best way to do this. I'd like to be able to style it as one div (if possible).

What's the best way to create an octogonal div?

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1  
You can't. Your options are faking it with an image or using SVG/VML –  Sam Dufel Feb 17 '12 at 1:45
1  
or css, which is exactly what im after... –  fancy Feb 17 '12 at 1:50
    
The example below isn't really an octogonal div; it's a square with the corners obscured. It's fine if you just need to display an octagon, but you need to put anything layered behind it, you're in trouble. –  Sam Dufel Feb 17 '12 at 1:56
1  
@SamDufel jsfiddle.net/uBC2X –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 17 '12 at 2:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The CSS used in this link is this:

#octagon {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: red;
    position: relative;
}

#octagon:before {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;    
    border-bottom: 29px solid red;
    border-left: 29px solid #eee;
    border-right: 29px solid #eee;
        width: 42px;
    height: 0;
}

#octagon:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;    
    border-top: 29px solid red;
    border-left: 29px solid #eee;
    border-right: 29px solid #eee;
    width: 42px;
    height: 0;
}

It is constructed from the div element itself which is given a rectangular shape. Using the :before and :after pseudo classes, content is added to create two trapeziums that complete the octagon. Cleverly this keeps the actual tag count at just one by using the funkier bits of CSS.

The origins of this technique can be found here.


Here is a quick demo. The blue part is the :before CSS and the green the :after CSS. And even better, here is a demo that allows transparent backgrounds! (thank you @GGG).

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I stand corrected. +1. –  AlienWebguy Feb 17 '12 at 1:48
    
I'd +1 for a mind-bogglingly cool link, but I'm out of votes today =/ Great find, though –  Joe Feb 17 '12 at 1:49
    
Thanks for this example, I was expecting to use :before and :after. Exactly what I was looking for, thank you. –  fancy Feb 17 '12 at 1:50
    
@Joe That's quite alright; it's the thought that counts. I particularly like the Yin Yang in my posted link - it's fantastically simple! –  Bojangles Feb 17 '12 at 1:51
    
You can #link to the Yin Yang: css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS/#yin-yang –  thirtydot Feb 17 '12 at 1:54

How about just making a square, rotate it 45 degrees and then clip the corners?

.octagon {
    height: 10em;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 10em;
}

.octagon:after {
    background: red;
    content: " ";
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;


  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg); 
     -moz-transform: rotate(45deg); 
      -ms-transform: rotate(45deg); 
       -o-transform: rotate(45deg); 
          transform: rotate(45deg); 

}

jsFiddle

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1  
+1 because it has transparent borders –  Alex Jul 16 at 11:14

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