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Lets say I have a table called Gamers. Gamers contains the columns GamerID, GameID, Score.

I am interested in selecting the highest scoring player of each game.

For example,

|Gamers
|-------------------------
|GamerID | GameID | Score
|1       | 1      | 10
|2       | 1      | 10
|3       | 1      | 10
|4       | 1      | 90
|5       | 2      | 40
|6       | 2      | 10
|7       | 3      | 10
|8       | 3      | 30

After the query, I hope to get the rows for GamerID 4, 5 and 8. What is the query that would do this?

share|improve this question
    
Is GamerID unique in that table, meaning each gamer plays only one game? – Naveen Kumar Feb 17 '12 at 7:00
    
@Naveen Yes it is. I intended the example to be an analog of my actual table, so I can omit a whole bunch of details. – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 7:04
    
Then that table would not handle the case when the gamer player plays multiple games. – Naveen Kumar Feb 17 '12 at 7:32
    
Yes, that is correct. I was not thinking that far when I made the example to illustrate my problem. I can assure you my real table has nothing to do with gamers though! – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 7:40
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this:

SELECT gamers.*
FROM gamers
INNER JOIN 
 (SELECT 
   max(score) as maxscore, 
   gameid from gamers
   GROUP BY gameid) AS b
ON (b.gameid = gamers.gameid AND b.maxscore=gamers.score) ;
ORDER BY score DESC, gameid;

This will output:

+---------+--------+-------+
| gamerid | gameid | score |
+---------+--------+-------+
|       4 |      1 |    90 |
|       5 |      2 |    40 |
|       8 |      3 |    30 |
+---------+--------+-------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

The other option you can do is to create a temporary table or a view (if you don't like sub-query).

create temporary table games_score (
 SELECT max(score) as maxscore, gameid FROM gamers GROUP BY gameid
);

Then:

SELECT gamers.* 
FROM gamers 
INNER JOIN games_score AS b ON (b.gameid = gamers.gameid AND b.maxscore=gamers.score) 
ORDER BY score DESC, gameid;

OR a view:

create or replace view games_score AS 
SELECT max(score) as maxscore, gameid FROM gamers GROUP BY gameid;

Then:

SELECT gamers.* 
FROM gamers 
INNER JOIN games_score AS b ON (b.gameid = gamers.gameid AND b.maxscore=gamers.score) 
ORDER BY score DESC, gameid;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this worked. It took 0.12 sec. I am wondering if this was caused by previous queries though? – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:44
    
@Morpork The query/results set was probable cached this maybe why. A temporary or view should load faster the data – Book Of Zeus Feb 17 '12 at 3:53
    
I suspected this and reran all the 4 answers. The time taken was the same for everyone. Not sure what to make of that. I expected the second run to be faster because of caching. (shows what I know about mysql haha) – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:55
1  
Marking this as the answer as it appears to be the fastest among all solutions. Also, I think this is the simplest command that would work. SELECT GamerID, MAX(Score) FROM Gamers GROUP BY GameID – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 7:08
1  
temp table or view: great idea – Tech4Wilco Feb 19 '12 at 0:03

Try this:

select g1.* from gamers g1
left join gamers g2
on g1.gameId = g2.gameId and g1.score < g2.score
where g2.score is null

Result given provided data:

+---------+--------+-------+
| GAMERID | GAMEID | SCORE |
+---------+--------+-------+
|       4 |      1 |    90 |
|       5 |      2 |    40 |
|       8 |      3 |    30 |
+---------+--------+-------+
share|improve this answer
    
But what happens if you have a tie such as (gamerid, gameid, score) = (9, 3, 30)? The policy for such situations is unspecified of course but it can still happen. – mu is too short Feb 17 '12 at 3:05
1  
Both results will be returned because both result will be the max. – Mosty Mostacho Feb 17 '12 at 3:09
    
Thanks, this works. When I ran this on my thousands rows table, It took 9 seconds but when I ran @johntotetwoo 's solution, it took 0.89 seconds. Is this because of the query or because I ran your solution first? – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:37
    
I don't think so. I thought the left join would be faster than the group bys. Probably I was wrong. Maybe there is such a huge amount of players that the comparison < is taking too much. Or maybe this is aggravated by the fact that you might not have an index on score – Mosty Mostacho Feb 17 '12 at 3:50

try this:

SELECT a.GameID, a.GamerID, a.Score
FROM Gamers a INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT s.GameID, MAX(s.Score) AS Maxx
        FROM Gamers s
        GROUP BY s.GameID
    ) b ON (a.GameID = b.GameID) AND (a.Score = b.Maxx) 
ORDER BY GameID;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this also works. – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:38

You could accomplish this using a sub-select, like below:

SELECT GameID, GamerID, Score
FROM Gamers
WHERE Score = (
     SELECT
     MAX(scores.Score)
     FROM Gamers AS scores
     WHERE scores.GameID = Gamers.GameID
)
GROUP BY GameID

Tested on:

CREATE TABLE Gamers (
  GamerID int(11) NOT NULL,
  GameID int(11) NOT NULL,
  Score int(11) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO Gamers (GamerID, GameID, Score) VALUES
(1, 1, 10),
(2, 1, 10),
(3, 1, 10),
(4, 1, 90),
(5, 2, 40),
(6, 2, 10),
(7, 3, 10),
(8, 3, 10);

Of course this won't be ideal in situations where two gamers achieve the same score for a given game.

share|improve this answer
2  
that would return all rows though. – CincauHangus Feb 17 '12 at 2:54
1  
@CincauHangus you're right - I deleted my answer, then revised it after more thought. – Michael Robinson Feb 17 '12 at 3:10
    
Thanks, this worked. It took 18.3 seconds on my ~1300 row table though. (The table has a bunch of additional stuff too) – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:41
    
Do you have a primary key and or any indexes? – Michael Robinson Feb 17 '12 at 3:43
    
The GamerID is the primary key. – Morpork Feb 17 '12 at 3:47

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