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Im rewriting application from .NET to PHP. I need to create class like this:

class myClass
{
    public ${'property-name-with-minus-signs'} = 5;
    public {'i-have-a-lot-of-this'} = 5; //tried with "$" and without
}

But it doesnt work. I dont want to use something like this:

$myClass = new stdClass();
$myClass->{'blah-blah'};

Because i have a lot of this in code.

Edit few days later: i was writing application that uses SOAP. These fancy names are used in API which i had to communicate with.

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1  
Why do you need the curly braces? What's wrong with just doing public $property-name-with-minus-signs = 5? –  Bojangles Feb 17 '12 at 3:05
4  
@Jam Uhm... it doesn't work? :) –  deceze Feb 17 '12 at 3:09
2  
@JamWaffles: Maybe... the syntax error? :) –  minitech Feb 17 '12 at 3:09
4  
@Kamil Why do you need properties with dashes in the first place? PHP isn't .NET, and dashes in variable or property names are uncommon in the PHP world (guess why; because they don't work). CamelCasing is the usual way to write those. –  deceze Feb 17 '12 at 3:12
3  
@deceze: I don't think you can use dashes in identifiers in any .NET language, either. –  minitech Feb 17 '12 at 3:16
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3 Answers

You cannot use hyphens (dashes) in PHP class properties. PHP variable names, class properties, function names and method names must begin with a letter or underscore ([A-Za-z_]) and may be followed by any number of digits ([0-9]).

You can get around this limitation by using member overloading:

class foo
{
    private $_data = array(
        'some-foo' => 4,
    );

    public function __get($name) {
        if (isset($this->_data[$name])) {
            return $this->_data[$name];
        }

        return NULL;
    }

    public function __set($name, $value) {
        $this->_data[$name] = $value;
    }
}

$foo = new foo();
var_dump($foo->{'some-foo'});
$foo->{'another-var'} = 10;
var_dump($foo->{'another-var'});

However, I would heavily discourage this method as it is very intensive and just generally a bad way to program. Variables and members with dashes are not common in either PHP or .NET as has been pointed out.

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1  
As i wrote - they works (as dynamic properties, but i need to clone that class and i need default value in cloned class. –  Kamil Feb 17 '12 at 3:25
    
$foo->{'some-var'} - yes, __get does work. –  minitech Feb 17 '12 at 3:43
    
@minitech true, fixed. –  Highway of Life Feb 17 '12 at 4:43
1  
@Kamil Set default in the constructor. Or I have a good idea! Don't use identifiers that contain a hyphen! :) –  kapa Feb 17 '12 at 10:01
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You can use the __get magic method to achieve this, although it may become inconvenient, depending on the purpose:

class MyClass {
    private $properties = array(
        'property-name-with-minus-signs' => 5
    );

    public function __get($prop) {
        if(isset($this->properties[$prop])) {
            return $this->properties[$prop];
        }

        throw new Exception("Property $prop does not exist.");
    }
}

It should work well for your purposes, however, considering that -s aren't allowed in identifiers in most .NET languages anyway and you're probably using an indexer, which is analogous to __get.

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Im PHP noob. I need to try this. Thank you minitech. –  Kamil Feb 17 '12 at 3:35
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I used code like this:

class myClass
{

    function __construct() {

        // i had to initialize class with some default values
        $this->{'fvalue-string'} = '';
        $this->{'fvalue-int'} = 0;
        $this->{'fvalue-float'} = 0;
        $this->{'fvalue-image'} = 0;
        $this->{'fvalue-datetime'} = 0;   
    }
}
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