Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that I could fill rows using a source in an array using Pywin32 like

import win32com.client as win32
excel = win32.gencache.EnsureDispatch('Excel.Application')
excel.Visible = True
wb = excel.Workbooks.Add()
ws = wb.Worksheets('Sheet1')
ws.Range("A4:D4").Value = [i for i in range(1,5)]

But in single column case, When I try this like

ws.Range("A1:A4").Value = [i for i in range(1,5)]

I got four 1 in column 'A', but what I wanted is 1, 2, 3, 4 in column 'A'

Is there similar way to deal with column?

If no, what's the most efficient way to fill multiple cells once?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You could do:

for col_idx, i in enumerate(xrange(1,5)):
    ws.Cells(1, col_idx+1).Value = i
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, I know this way. But is it efficient if the column is ver long? –  Sean Feb 17 '12 at 3:47
    
Either way you've got a for loop. –  bernie Feb 17 '12 at 4:06

What you need to do is

import win32com.client as win32
excel = win32.gencache.EnsureDispatch('Excel.Application')
excel.Visible = True
wb = excel.Workbooks.Add()
ws = wb.Worksheets('Sheet1')
ws.Range("A1:A4").Value = [[i] for i in range(1,5)]

What you did before was try to fit [1, 2, 3, 4] into a column. However, when it gets converted to the excel formatting an array is always converted into a row. So when you create a 2D array you create an array of rows which is how excel views a column. So what you want is [[1],[2],[3],[4]]. Which is what the code above generates.

EDIT: I realize this may not be the best wording in the world. If you don't get it just ask and I will try to come up with a better explanation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.