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Sorry if this is a basic question. I have found info on creating modules, but havent found much about variable scope when using modules.

When I originally wrote my program, it was written as a single document

var mongodb = require('mongodb');
var server = new mongodb.Server("192.168.199.10", 27017, {});

new mongodb.Db('syslog', server, {}).open(function (error, client) {
    if (error) throw error;
    var collection = new mongodb.Collection(client, 'messages');


    collection.distinct("JUNOS.SRC.IP", function(err, results) {
        var sessionCounts = [];

        function parseSessionCounts(hosts, callback) {
            var loop = 1,
                numLoop = hosts.length;

            hosts.forEach(function(element){
                collection.find({"JUNOS.SRC.IP": element, "JUNOS.ACTION":'closed'}).count(function(err,count){
                    if (loop++ < numLoop){
                        sessionCounts.push({host:element,count:count});
                    } else {
                        sessionCounts.push({host:element,count:count});
                        callback();
                    }
                })
            });
        }

        parseSessionCounts(results, function() {
            console.log(sessionCounts);
            client.close();
        });
    })
});

To make my code reusable, I broke out the parseSessionCount function into a module:

sessionCount.js

var sessionjs = require('./session'),
    mongodb = require('mongodb'),
    server = new mongodb.Server("192.168.199.10", 27017, {});

new mongodb.Db('syslog', server, {}).open(function (error, client) {
    if (error) throw error;
    var collection = new mongodb.Collection(client, 'messages');


    collection.distinct("JUNOS.SRC.IP", function(err, results) {
        var sessionCounts = [];


        sessionjs.parseSessionCounts(results, collection, sessionCounts, function() {
            console.log(sessionCounts);
            client.close();
        });
    })
});

and session.js

module.exports = {

        parseSessionCounts: function (hosts, collection, sessionCounts, callback) {
            var loop = 1,
            numLoop = hosts.length;

            hosts.forEach(function(element){
                collection.find({"JUNOS.SRC.IP": element, "JUNOS.ACTION":'closed'}).count(function(err,count){
                    if (loop++ < numLoop){
                        sessionCounts.push({host:element,count:count});
                    } else {
                        sessionCounts.push({host:element,count:count});
                        callback();
                    }
                })
            });
        }   


    }

In making this change, I noticed that I had to now pass variables (collection and sessionCounts) to the function even though the function calls are still within the scope of the variable definition. Is there another way to do this without having to pass the variables or will this always be required since it is a module that is defined outside of the scope of the defined variables?

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1 Answer

Yes. JavaScript is lexically scoped, not dynamically scoped. Even though the function is invoked when the variables are active they are not accessible because the function is not in the same scope. The wikipedia article, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexical_scope, does a pretty good job of explaining the difference.

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