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Ok something so simple is just not working for me. I got a cmdlet that accepts a single parameter. I am trying to call a cmdlet within a Windows batch file. The batch file contains:

cd %SystemRoot%\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0
powershell Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
powershell 'C:\convert-utf8-to-utf16.ps1 C:\test.txt'
powershell Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted
pause

My ps1 file again not doing anything special:

function convert-utf8-to-utf16 {   
  $tempfile = "C:\temp.txt"
  set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
  get-content -Path $args[0] -encoding utf8 | out-file $tempfile -encoding Unicode
  set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted
  }

When i execute the bat file it just runs to completion (no error messages) and it does not appear to create the temp.txt file.

I can run the powershell command file at the PS command prompt but not in cmd!

Anyone got any ideas what could be wrong?

Thanks

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Johannes: cmd.exe is a Win32 application (though many people still think of it as the DOS command.com). [The question should be edited] –  grawity May 31 '09 at 16:31
    
any final solution with full source code about it ? –  Kiquenet May 30 '12 at 9:27

6 Answers 6

Starting with Powershell version 2, you can run a Powershell script like so...

powershell -ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned -File "C:\Path\Script.ps1" "Parameter with spaces" Parameter2

Now if I could only figure out a way to handle dragging and dropping files to a Powershell script.

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Thank you so much this solved my headache and avoided to convert powershell to NSIS –  CharlesB Jan 25 '13 at 14:53

The problem is in the ps1 file - you declare a function but you don't call it. I would modify it like this:

param($path)
function convert-utf8-to-utf16 {   
 $tempfile = "C:\temp.txt"
 set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
 get-content -Path $args[0] -encoding utf8 | out-file $tempfile -encoding Unicode
 set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted
}

convert-utf8-to-utf16 $path

it will work. However, it is not needed, you can simply ommit the function declaration and move the body into the script itself:

param($path)
$tempfile = "C:\temp.txt"
set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
get-content -Path $path -encoding utf8 | out-file $tempfile -encoding Unicode
set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted
share|improve this answer

I explain both why you would want to call a PowerShell script from a batch file and how to do it in my blog post here.

This is basically what you are looking for:

PowerShell -NoProfile -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Command "& 'C:\convert-utf8-to-utf16.ps1' 'C:\test.txt'"

And if you need to run your PowerShell script as an admin, use this:

PowerShell -NoProfile -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Command "& {Start-Process PowerShell -ArgumentList '-NoProfile -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -File ""C:\convert-utf8-to-utf16.ps1"" ""C:\test.txt""' -Verb RunAs}"

Rather than hard-coding the entire path to the PowerShell script though, I recommend placing the batch file and PowerShell script file in the same directory, as my blog post describes.

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# Test-Args.ps1
param($first, $second)
write-host $first
write-host $second

Call from Command Prompt:

PowerShell.exe -NoProfile -Command "& {./Test-Args.ps1 'C:\Folder A\One' 'C:\Folder B\Two'}"

What's confusing is that if the script is in a folder path containing spaces, PowerShell doesn't recognize the script name in quotes:

PowerShell.exe -NoProfile -Command "& {'C:\Folder X\Test-Args.ps1' 'C:\Folder
 A\One' 'C:\Folder B\Two'}"

But you can get around that using something like:

PowerShell.exe -NoProfile -Command "& {set-location 'C:\Folder X';./Test-Args.ps1 'C:\Folder
 A\One' 'C:\Folder B\Two'}"

Don't use spaces in your .PS1 file name, or you're outta luck.

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I got this working...The ps1 file does not need to be wrapped into a function. Just this declaration is ok.

$tempfile = "C:\temp.txt"  
get-content -Path $args[0] -encoding utf8 | out-file $tempfile -encoding unicode

and the bat file calls it like:

cd %SystemRoot%\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0
powershell Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
powershell "& 'C:\convert-utf8-to-utf16.ps1 C:\test.txt' 'C:\test.txt'"
powershell Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted
pause
share|improve this answer
    
What you ran into is that the script was definining a function, but not executing it. You could either call the function at the end of the script, or not wrap your code in a function at all (like you ended up doing). –  JasonMArcher Jun 4 '09 at 3:49

Try this syntax instead:

cd %SystemRoot%\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0
powershell {Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted}
powershell "& C:\convert-utf8-to-utf16.ps1 C:\test.txt"
powershell {Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted}
pause
share|improve this answer

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