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{
    "cities" : {
        "San Francisco" : {
            "location Name" : "San Francisco, CA",
            "data" : "51.1"
        },

        "San Jose" : {
            "location Name" : "San Jose, CA",
            "data" : "52.5"
        }
    }
}

how to get San Jose, CA?

myJSON.cities.['San Jose'].[location name] doesn't work

how to get 52.5? myJSON.cities.['San Jose'].data?

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"How to deal with whitespace in JSON?" JSON ignores it, so you should too. –  squint Feb 17 '12 at 4:40
    
You're already half there with myJSON.cities.['San Jose'].[location name] - just use quotation marks on 'location name' like you already did for 'San Jose'. –  nnnnnn Feb 17 '12 at 4:42
    
You should really take a hard look and figure out if yo actually need those spaces in the first place –  Jibi Abraham Feb 17 '12 at 4:43
    
i mean, i can just do myJSON.cities.san jose.data, so I was wondering about the syntax of dealing with white-space on Google but did not find any. Thanks guys. –  JJ Liu Feb 17 '12 at 4:45
    
@nnnnnn missing the '' was a typo, but adding those does not help –  JJ Liu Feb 17 '12 at 4:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't do both attribute access and indexing. Pick one or the other.

myJSON.cities['San Jose']['location Name']

The second is allowed, since each object is accessed independently.

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thanks. how to get 52.5? myJSON.cities.['San Jose'].data? –  JJ Liu Feb 17 '12 at 4:41
    
@JJLiu - Did you try it? myJSON.cities.['San Jose'].data or myJSON.cities.['San Jose']['data'] should work fine. –  nnnnnn Feb 17 '12 at 5:48
    
@nnnnnn yes, it works, thanks guys –  JJ Liu Feb 19 '12 at 7:54
myJSON.cities['San Jose']['location Name']
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