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I'm using event.stopPropagation() in my application. There has appeared, however, one scenario where I want the propagation to continue as if the aforementioned function was never called. So I'm wondering; is there a way to "resume" propagation after it's been stopped? It would be terribly tedious to move the one call to event.stopPropagation to a dozen separate conditional statements.

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Mmmm...stackoverflow.com/questions/4735006/… –  elclanrs Feb 17 '12 at 8:20
    
If there were such a facility, wouldn't you need a dozen conditional statements to decide if you should invoke it? –  Jon Feb 17 '12 at 8:22
    
They are already there. There would be one call to event.stopPropagation() and (rarely) one call to the hypothetical event.resumePropagation(). That would be preferable over calling event.stopPropagation() in all conditionals except one –  Hubro Feb 17 '12 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Once propagation has been stopped, it cannot be resumed. As a workaround, what you can do is set a variable, and then only stop if this variable is true:

var stop = false;
// do your logic here
if(stop){
    event.stopPropagation();
}
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2  
I didn't think of that. That's way cleaner than my backup solution. It would be optimal if you could edit your answer and include the fact that "once propagation has been stopped, it can't be resumed" –  Hubro Feb 17 '12 at 9:45
    
Just edited it! –  Schiavini Feb 17 '12 at 9:49

Put the event.stopPropagation() call inside your condition. For example

$el.click(function(event) {
    if (some_condition) {
        event.stopPropagation()
        // do stuff
    }
    else {
        // do other stuff, without stopping propagation
    }
});

Tedious it may be, but unfortunately stopPropagation is a one way switch. Once stopped, you can't turn it back on for the same event.

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It's not "a" condition. It's a lot of conditions. Quoting myself: "It would be terribly tedious to move the one call to event.stopPropagation to a dozen separate conditional statements" –  Hubro Feb 17 '12 at 8:24
    
Tedious it may be, but unfortunately stopPropagation is a one way switch. Once stopped, you can't turn it back on for the same event. –  Rory McCrossan Feb 17 '12 at 8:28
    
Now that is the answer I was looking for. As that actually answers my question, I will accept it if you edit –  Hubro Feb 17 '12 at 8:31
1  
No worries - my fault for not fully reading your OP :) –  Rory McCrossan Feb 17 '12 at 8:59

Just refactor your original event like this:

var refEvent = event.originalEvent;
refEvent.cancelBubble = false;
refEvent.defaultPrevented = false;
refEvent.returnValue = true;
refEvent.timeStamp = (new Date()).getTime();

if (event.target.dispatchEvent){
    event.target.dispatchEvent(refEvent);
} else if (event.target.fireEvent) {
    event.target.fireEvent(refEvent);
}
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