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Given a StackPanel:

<StackPanel>
  <TextBox Height="30">Apple</TextBox>
  <TextBox Height="80">Banana</TextBox>
  <TextBox Height="120">Cherry</TextBox>
</StackPanel>

What's the best way to space out the child elements so that there are equally-sized gaps between them, even though the child elements themselves are of different sizes? Can it be done without setting properties on each of the individual children?

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7 Answers

up vote 108 down vote accepted

Use Margin or Padding, applied to the scope within the container:

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
            <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,10,0,0"/>
        </Style>
    </StackPanel.Resources> 
    <TextBox Text="Apple"/>
    <TextBox Text="Banana"/>
    <TextBox Text="Cherry"/>
</StackPanel>

EDIT: In case you would want to re-use the margin between two containers, you can convert the margin value to a resource in an outer scope, f.e.

<Window.Resources>
    <Thickness x:Key="tbMargin">0,10,0,0</Thickness>
</Window.Resources>

and then refer to this value in the inner scope

<StackPanel.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
        <Setter Property="Margin" Value="{StaticResource tbMargin}"/>
    </Style>
</StackPanel.Resources>
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4  
The scoped Style is an awesome way to do that - thanks for the tip! –  Paul Betts May 31 '09 at 18:41
1  
What if i want to use it for entire project ? –  grv_9098 Nov 28 '12 at 13:09
    
+1 So good! Thanks a lot! –  Sonhja Apr 24 '13 at 8:45
    
Can someone explain why this only works when you explicitly define the type (e.g. TextBox)? If I try this using FrameworkElement so that all children are spaced, it has no effect. –  Schneider Jan 28 at 18:48
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Another nice approach can be seen here: http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/eladkatz/archive/2011/05/29/what-is-the-easiest-way-to-set-spacing-between-items-in-stackpanel.aspx

It shows how to create an attached behavior, so that syntax like this would work:

<StackPanel local:MarginSetter.Margin="5">
   <TextBox Text="hello" />
   <Button Content="hello" />
   <Button Content="hello" />
</StackPanel>

This is the easiest & fastest way to set Margin to several children of a panel, even if they are not of the same type. (I.e. Buttons, TextBoxes, ComboBoxes, etc.)

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This is a pretty interesting way to go about this. It makes a lot of assumptions about exactly how you want to space things, and even gives you an opportunity to automatically adjust the margins on the first/last items. –  Armentage Jun 23 '11 at 4:40
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The UniformGrid might not be available in Silverlight, but someone has ported it from WPF. http://www.jeff.wilcox.name/2009/01/uniform-grid/

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+1 for Sergey's answer. And if you want to apply that to all your StackPanels you can do this:

<Style TargetType="{x:Type StackPanel}">
    <Style.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
            <Setter Property="Margin" Value="{StaticResource tbMargin}"/>
        </Style>
    </Style.Resources>
</Style>

But beware: if you define a style like this in your App.xaml (or another dictionary that is merged into the Application.Resources) it can override the default style of the control. For mostly lookless controls like the stackpanel it isn't a problem, but for textboxes etc you may stumble upon this problem, which luckily has some workarounds.

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<Style.Resources> Are u sure about it coz when i tried this it was showing error. –  grv_9098 Nov 29 '12 at 9:50
    
Sorry, I can't remember off-hand. I'll have to try it myself to see. I'll get back to you. –  Andre Luus Nov 29 '12 at 14:01
    
That will be thankful. –  grv_9098 Nov 30 '12 at 5:01
    
Yes, it does work. Just did the same to set TextWeight="Bold" on all TextBlocks in a StackPanel. Only difference was I set the style explicitly on the StackPanel. –  Andre Luus Nov 30 '12 at 7:05
    
Thanks for ur concern but I still have doubt.I know about that It called Scope Style. I guess it will be <StackPanel.Resources> and not <Style.Resources> . It will be more great if you can paste the code piece of your... –  grv_9098 Nov 30 '12 at 10:26
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If you use a UniformGrid control, you can obtain the same effect. This will automatically space out your controls both vertically and horizontally. See here for an example. Hope this helps!

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The cells in a UniformGrid are always the same size, so if the child elements were of different sizes then the gaps between them would be different, which isn't the effect I want. By "evenly space" I actually mean "space out so that there are equally-sized gaps between them" - I will update my question to clarify. Sorry! –  GraemeF May 31 '09 at 18:39
    
This will make resizing look goofy –  Paul Betts May 31 '09 at 18:45
    
Second link is broken. –  mizipzor Oct 17 '13 at 8:42
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Following up on Sergey's suggestion, you can define and reuse a whole Style (with various property setters, including Margin) instead of just a Thickness object:

<Style x:Key="MyStyle" TargetType="SomeItemType">
  <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,5,0,5" />
  ...
</Style>

...

  <StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
      <Style TargetType="SomeItemType" BasedOn="{StaticResource MyStyle}" />
    </StackPanel.Resources>
  ...
  </StackPanel>

Note that the trick here is the use of Style Inheritance for the implicit style, inheriting from the style in some outer (probably merged from external XAML file) resource dictionary.

Sidenote:

At first, I naively tried to use the implicit style to set the Style property of the control to that outer Style resource (say defined with the key "MyStyle"):

<StackPanel>
  <StackPanel.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="SomeItemType">
      <Setter Property="Style" Value={StaticResource MyStyle}" />
    </Style>
  </StackPanel.Resources>
</StackPanel>

which caused Visual Studio 2010 to shut down immediately with CATASTROPHIC FAILURE error (HRESULT: 0x8000FFFF (E_UNEXPECTED)), as described at https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/753211/xaml-editor-window-fails-with-catastrophic-failure-when-a-style-tries-to-set-style-property#

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sometimes you need to set Padding, not Margin to make space between items smaller than default

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