Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this code:

template<typename T>
class Base
{
   template<typename U>
   friend void f(void *ptr) {
     static_cast<Base<U>*>(ptr)->run();
   }
   protected:
       virtual void run() = 0; 
};

class A : public Base<A>
{
   protected:
       virtual void run() {}
};

/*
class B : public Base<B>
{
   protected:
       virtual void run() {}
};
*/

It compiles fine now (ideone). But if I uncomment the definition of B, then it gives the following error (ideone):

prog.cpp: In instantiation of ‘Base<B>’:
prog.cpp:20:   instantiated from here
prog.cpp:6: error: redefinition of ‘template<class U> void f(void*)’
prog.cpp:6: error: ‘template<class U> void f(void*)’ previously defined here

I know (well,I think I know) the reason why it gives this error.

So my question is :

How to avoid redefinition error in case of in-class definition of friend function template?

As long as I provide the definition of the primary template (not specialization) inside the class, I will get this error. There is also another problem with defining primary template in this way: it makes all instantiations of f function template friend of all instantiations of Base class template, which I also would like to avoid. I want to make f<T> a friend of Base<T> but not f<U> a friend of Base<T> if U and T are not same. At the same time, I also want to provide the definition inside the class. Is it possible?

share|improve this question
    
I see no reason why the compiler should error out on that, and it seems the clang people don't see a reason too, as it compiles with clang. –  PlasmaHH Feb 17 '12 at 9:25
    
GCC and MSVC10 both give error if I uncomment the definition of B. –  Nawaz Feb 17 '12 at 9:44
    
@PlasmaHH: Because a friend function is not a member function and therefore can be non-dependent of the class template's arguments. –  phresnel Feb 17 '12 at 10:49
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you really need to define f into the class? If you define it outside, your problem disappears and you can also enforce the one-to-one relationship you want (i.e. only f<T> is a friend of Base<T>):

template <typename T> class Base;

template <typename U>
void f(void *ptr) {
   static_cast<Base<U>*>(ptr)->run();
}

template<typename T>
class Base
{
   friend void f<T>(void *ptr); //only one instanciation is a friend

   protected:
     virtual void run() = 0; 
};

However, note that the fact that only f<T> is a friend of Base<T> will not prevent the following code from compiling:

B b;
f<A>(&b); // compiles, f<A> calls Base<A>::run, but the cast is wrong
share|improve this answer
add comment

A friend function is a global function, even if you put its implementation into the body of any class. The problem is that when you instantiate Base<T> twice (in any context) you provide two implementations of f. Note, that f does not depend on T, and it cannot use T; it's the same function for all Base<T>.

A simple solution is to provide only the declaration of f within the class template and implementation outside it:

template<typename T>
class Base
{
  template<typename U>
  friend void f(void *ptr);
  protected:
    virtual void run() = 0;
};


template<typename U>
void f(void *ptr) {
  static_cast<Base<U>*>(ptr)->run();
}

class A : public Base<A>
{
 protected:
   virtual void run() {}
};

class B : public Base<B>
{
protected:
  virtual void run() {}
};

int main() {
}

The above code compiles with my g++

share|improve this answer
    
I know it works (I've tried it already), and I said it in my post that I do not want to do this. –  Nawaz Feb 17 '12 at 10:36
    
By the constraints you provided, I think you have to do that, for the reason I explained in the first paragraph. –  CygnusX1 Feb 17 '12 at 10:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.