Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an html-form with several text fields.

When I try to submit not English characters (Russian in my case) server is received "unreadable" string (not questions - "???" but some strange characters).

I simplified my code to show it here:

<%@ taglib uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core" prefix="c" %>
<%@ page contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8" language="java" %>
<html>
  <head><title>Simple jsp page</title></head>
  <body>
    <c:out value="${param.rustext}"/>
    <form action="/test" method="post">
        <input type="text" name="rustext" width="30">
        <input type="submit" value="Submit">
    </form>
  </body>
</html>

How should I fix that?

share|improve this question
2  
Are your page headers actually sending UTF-8 as the encoding? Check with something like Fiddler –  Chris Ballance May 31 '09 at 18:05
    
And what should I do if they aren't? –  Roman May 31 '09 at 18:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Tomcat uses ISO-8859-1 a the default character decoder for URL parameters, regardless of the encoding of the page that contains the URL. This can be changed with the "URIEncoding" attribute in its Connector configuration. Other application servers may have similar settings.

This article covers many problems commonly encountered when working with JSP.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I use Tomcat. Thanks for the link, I'll try to find something usefull there. –  Roman May 31 '09 at 18:41
    
See tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-5.5-doc/config/http.html for the specifics of the URIEncoding attribute. –  erickson May 31 '09 at 19:19
    
This answer is actually wrong. The OP was using POST, not GET. –  BalusC Sep 29 '10 at 11:30

Erickson explained this very well on this page. A server-independent solution is to use a character encoding filter, à la org.springframework.web.filter.CharacterEncodingFilter. See example below:

import java.io.IOException;
import javax.servlet.Filter;
import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.FilterConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;

public class EncodingFilter implements Filter {
    private String encoding = "utf-8";
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response,
            FilterChain filterChain) throws IOException, ServletException {
        request.setCharacterEncoding(encoding);
        filterChain.doFilter(request, response);
    }
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {
        String encodingParam = filterConfig.getInitParameter("encoding");
        if (encodingParam != null) {
            encoding = encodingParam;
        }
    }
    public void destroy() {
        // nothing todo
    }
}

In web.xml add the filter declaration and the filter url mapping in the appropriate sections:

  <filter>
  <filter-name>EncodingFilter</filter-name>
  <description>
    <![CDATA[Changes the encoding of the request, in order to help the appserver to correctly interpret request params]]>
  </description>
  <filter-class>com.mypackage.EncodingFilter</filter-class>  
 <init-param>
    <param-name>encoding</param-name>
    <param-value>ISO-8859-15</param-value>
  </init-param>   
</filter>


  <filter-mapping>
      <filter-name>EncodingFilter</filter-name>
      <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
  </filter-mapping>
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this only covers the request body, not the request URL. In other words: this will set encoding for POST requests, not for GET requests. For GET requests you still need to fiddle with the servletcontainer's config, as outlined in Erickson's answer. –  BalusC Sep 29 '10 at 11:28
    
Right, I haven't thought about the URL. –  Victor Ionescu Sep 29 '10 at 11:56

When using POST - which is a must tu use encoding - the form is send as content-type "application/x-www-form-urlencoded". You may specify the form-attribute accept-charset="UTF-8" to specify your encoding.

share|improve this answer
    
I've already tried and it doesn't work –  Roman May 31 '09 at 19:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.