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I'm trying to write an automated test harness using WPF and F#. I'd like to display aggregate test results as rows in a multi-column list. Ideally, I would like to present rich content in each cell, e.g. highlighting issues with specific tests using color or making details available via tooltips. However, I cannot figure out how to put anything richer than a plain string into a multi-column ListView.

Furthermore, I'm not a fan of XAML or data binding and prefer to write vanilla F# code. The simplest program I have been able to write that displays a multi-column WPF ListView is:

open System.Windows

let gridView = Controls.GridView()
let listView = Controls.ListView(View=gridView)

type SystemParams = { Name: string; Value: obj }

[<System.STAThread>]
do
  let column header binding =
    let binding = Data.Binding binding
    Controls.GridViewColumn(Header=header, DisplayMemberBinding=binding)

  for header, binding in ["Name", "Name"; "Value", "Value"] do
    column header binding
    |> gridView.Columns.Add

  for prop in typeof<SystemParameters>.GetProperties() do
    if prop.PropertyType <> typeof<ResourceKey> then
      { Name = prop.Name; Value = prop.GetValue(null, null) }
      |> listView.Items.Add
      |> ignore

  Application().Run(Window(Content=listView)) |> ignore

Although this works, I don't like the way it requires the field names to be duplicated both in the type definition and as strings that are fed to WPF which presumably then uses reflection to resolve them at run-time (yuk!). Ideally, I would like to Add an obj array giving the WPF controls for each cell.

Is ListView capable of this? If so, how do you write a function that accepts a 2D array of controls and returns a ListView that visualizes them?

If not, I will probably use a Grid instead. I have tried DataGrid before and it is just a world of pain in comparison...

EDIT:

Thanks to the answers below, I have been able to come up with a solution. The multiColumnList function in the program below creates list of controls with the given headers and content with selectable rows:

open System.Windows

let multiColumnList columns contents onSelection =
  let gridView = Controls.GridView()
  let list = Controls.ListView(View=gridView)
  let column index header =
    let binding = Data.Binding(sprintf "[%d]" index)
    Controls.GridViewColumn(Header=header, DisplayMemberBinding=binding)
    |> gridView.Columns.Add
  Seq.iteri column columns
  list.ItemsSource <-
    [|for row in contents ->
        [|for elt in row ->
            box elt|]|]
  list.SelectionChanged.Add onSelection
  list

[<System.STAThread>]
do
  let columns = ["Name"; "Value"]
  let contents =
    [ for prop in typeof<SystemParameters>.GetProperties() do
        if prop.PropertyType <> typeof<ResourceKey> then
          yield [box prop.Name; prop.GetValue(null, null)] ]
  Application().Run(Window(Content=multiColumnList columns contents ignore))
  |> ignore
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You said Furthermore, I'm not a fan of XAML or data binding and prefer to write vanilla F# code. and then this I have tried DataGrid before and it is just a world of pain in comparison... the first statement is the problem isnt it? –  WPF-it Feb 17 '12 at 10:04
1  
@AngelWPF: No, the first statement is the solution. The world of pain is the reason why I prefer to write vanilla code. For example, what I really want is a function that takes a 2D array of controls and returns a multi-column list control that contains them. WPF makes this much harder than necessary. WPF's (ab)use of reflection in my example above means it can only handle a fixed pre-defined number of columns. –  Jon Harrop Feb 17 '12 at 14:23
1  
And why do you think 2D array cant be bound to any items control in WPF easily whetehr it is code behind OR using XAML? You just need the right template coded through FrameworkElementFactory!. –  WPF-it Feb 17 '12 at 14:30
    
@AngelWPF How much code is required to use templates and data binding when this could be a simple 1-line function call? How much extra work is then required to maintain multiple redundant copies of the same information encoded in the source code, e.g. method names encoded as strings, column information encoded in the template? –  Jon Harrop Feb 18 '12 at 15:32
    
@AngelWPF Note that FrameworkElementFactory has been deprecated. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Jon Harrop Feb 18 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your specific problem of duplicating the field names could be avoided by using an index based binding, instead of member name. See the changes to your example here:

open System
open System.Windows

let gridView = Controls.GridView()
let listView = Controls.ListView(View=gridView)

[<System.STAThread>]
do
  let column index header  =
    let binding = Data.Binding(sprintf "[%d]" index)
    Controls.GridViewColumn(Header=header, DisplayMemberBinding=binding)

  ["Name"; "Value"] 
  |> List.mapi column 
  |> List.iter gridView.Columns.Add

  for prop in typeof<SystemParameters>.GetProperties() do
    if prop.PropertyType <> typeof<ResourceKey> then
      ([| prop.Name; prop.GetValue(null, null) |] : Object array)
      |> listView.Items.Add
      |> ignore

  Application().Run(Window(Content=listView)) |> ignore

Regarding giving the ListView a sequence of sequences of controls, that is somewhat lower level than ListView is intended to be used. ListView and DataGrid both assume that you have some roughly homogeneous collection of objects that you want show (generally as rows) and some idea of what information you want to show about those objects (the column definitions). Both controls will help in that situation, although I do agree that their general assumption that you want to use reflection over the members of a type can be annoying.

If you want to be able to specify a grid of any controls, then as you mention the Grid panel layout is probably more suitable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Perfect, thank you! –  Jon Harrop Feb 20 '12 at 10:44

Yes, it possible but it's a little tricky, but once you've mastered the approach it's quite flexible. WFP has a flexible templating system that this available both though code and XAML, except there are far less examples of how to do this in code.

It basically involves working how to to use the FrameworkElementFactory to override the list box default template and show the UI elements you want. Then using the Binding class to specify how the controls should be bound to the data.

I wrote a twitter client in WPF and F# and I use this approach to display the columns of tweets in list boxes. Take a look at how the createTweetContainerTemplate function works. https://github.com/robertpi/TwitMemento/blob/master/Strangelights.TwitMemento.WPF/View.fs

Then again unless you really need a high level of control over how each row in the list box should be laid out, it maybe simpler to use a datagrid.

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1  
Wow, that is incredibly convoluted compared to what I was hoping for. Maybe the F# community should write a decent declarative wrapper API over WPF to make things like this a one-liner? –  Jon Harrop Feb 18 '12 at 15:37
1  
I have often though I F# wrapper to tidy up some of the sillier more verbose bits of WPF would be nice, but don't do enough WPF to have got round to building one. –  Robert Feb 18 '12 at 18:24

I made a simple combinator library to build WPF UI thru code, I use this pattern in my pit project for creating HTML elements.

namespace FSharp.WPF open System open System.Windows open System.Windows.Controls

[<AutoOpen>]
module Combinator =
    type XDef =
    | Attr      of string * obj
    | Tag       of Type * XDef list
    //| Element   of FrameworkElement

    [<AutoOpen>]
    module Operators =
        let (@=) (p:string) (v:obj) : XDef = Attr(p,v)

    module internal Helpers =
        let createEl (ty:Type) = new FrameworkElementFactory(ty)

    let tag name attr   = Tag(name,attr)
    //let el dom          = Element(dom)

    let rec build (tag:XDef) =
        match tag with
        | Tag(ty,defs)    ->
            let attrs = defs |> List.choose(fun t -> match t with | Attr(k,v) -> Some(k,v) | _ -> None)
            let tags = defs |> List.choose(fun t -> match t with | Tag(k,v) -> Some(t) | _ -> None)
            /// create the element and set attributes
            let el = Helpers.createEl(ty)
            let rec setProps (d:(string*obj) list) =
                match d with
                | []     -> ()
                | (p,v) :: t ->
                    let dp = System.ComponentModel.DependencyPropertyDescriptor.FromName(p, el.Type,el.Type)
                    el.SetValue(dp.DependencyProperty,v)
            setProps attrs

            let rec gen (d:XDef list) =
                match d with
                | []    -> ()
                | h::t  ->
                    let childEl = build(h)
                    el.AppendChild(childEl)
                    gen(t)
            gen tags
            el
        //| Element(el)       -> el
        | Attr(key,value)   -> failwith "Unrecognized sequence"

    let make xdef =
        let fEl = build xdef
        let contentEl = new ContentControl()
        contentEl.ContentTemplate <- new DataTemplate(VisualTree=fEl)
        contentEl :> FrameworkElement

Its very low profile now, just create objects, but it could be extended to do much more with databinding and other things etc., and a bit of type checking should find errors in object creation.

Usage: module Test = open System.Windows.Controls

    let create() =
        tag typeof<System.Windows.Controls.Button> ["Content"@="Hello World"]
        |> Combinator.make

    let create2() =
        tag typeof<StackPanel> [
            tag typeof<Button> ["Content"@="Button 1"]
            tag typeof<Button> ["Content"@="Button 2"]
        ]
        |> Combinator.make

[<STAThread>]
[<EntryPoint>]
let main(_) =
    let el     = Test.create2() // Test.create1()
    let window = new Window(Content = el, Height = 600.0, Width = 800.0, Title = "WpfApplication1")
    let app = new Application()
    app.Run(window)

As you see, nesting elements means Panel elements, but there could some extra leverage that allows the type to identify panel elements or content elements. But you get the idea, this could be useful. What do you think?

-Fahad

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