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I have the following input cases, but I don't want to examine the format myself and change the pattern everytime. I currently make use of DateTimeFormat.forPattern("dd.MM.yyyy");, this fails as soon as a), c) or d) are applied.

a) 1.1.12      => 01.01.0012 x
b) 01.01.2012  => 01.01.2012 ✓
c) 01.01.12    => 01.01.0012 x
d) 1.1.2012    => 01.00.2012 x

I can assure that the format is D.M.Y, but not if it's long or short or mixed up. Is there already a function in Joda which helps to choose the pattern given on a "base pattern"?

Thank you!

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I use a search path of patterns. Some dates are ambiguous, so you need to know how you want to handle them e.g. is 1.2.3 the first of Feb 3 AD/1903/2003 or second of January, 3 AD or 1 AD/1901/2001 Feb the third.

A simple pattern I use (except I cache the SimpleDateFormat objects ;)

public static Date parseDate(String dateStr) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    // optionally change the separator
    dateStr = dateStr.replaceAll("\\D+", "/");

    for (String fmt : "dd/MM/yy,yyyy/MM/dd,dd/MM/yyyy".split(",")) {
        try {
            SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(fmt);
            sdf.setLenient(false);
            return sdf.parse(dateStr);
        } catch (ParseException ignored) {
        }
    }
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unable to parse date '" + dateStr + "'");
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    String dates = "1.2.12\n" +
            "01.02.2012\n" +
            "2012.02.01\n" +
            "01-01-12\n" +
            "1.1.2012";
    for (String dateStr : dates.split("\n")) {
        Object result;
        try {
            result = parseDate(dateStr);
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
            result = e;
        }
        System.out.println(dateStr + " => " + result);
    }
}

prints

1.2.12 => Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 GMT 2012
01.02.2012 => Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 GMT 2012
2012.02.01 => Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 GMT 2012
01-01-12 => Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 GMT 2012
1.1.2012 => Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 GMT 2012
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1  
I don't know about a better way, but I just want to warn that relying on exceptions as a part of a program flow is against best practices, as it's harming performance. –  Vic Feb 17 '12 at 10:17
    
Thank you very much, the #setLenient is very helpful, didn't know that :) May I ask you a style question? Don't you like Arrays.asList("dd/MM/yy", "yyyy/MM/dd", "dd/MM/yyyy") or new Object[] { .. } or why are you using the #split() method? Isn't that more expensive? –  codevour Feb 17 '12 at 10:22
1  
I like split because its more concise. Its more expensive, but its simple to use a constant so its only performed once on startup. Caching the SimpleDateFormat is more important as creating these is much more expensive. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 17 '12 at 10:29
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I think I got a better solution using Joda-Time. I got it down to two parsers that you have to try:

    DateTimeFormatter f = new DateTimeFormatterBuilder()
            .appendDayOfMonth(1)
            .appendLiteral('.')
            .appendMonthOfYear(1)
            .appendLiteral('.')
            .appendTwoDigitYear(1970) // Notice this!!
            .toFormatter();

    System.out.println(f.parseDateTime("01.1.12"));
    System.out.println(f.parseDateTime("01.01.12"));

    f = new DateTimeFormatterBuilder()
            .appendDayOfMonth(1)
            .appendLiteral('.')
            .appendMonthOfYear(1)
            .appendLiteral('.')
            .appendYear(4,4)
            .toFormatter();

    System.out.println(f.parseDateTime("01.01.2012"));
    System.out.println(f.parseDateTime("1.1.2012"));
    System.out.println(f.parseDateTime("01.1.2012"));
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If you think of using try-catch-blocks, I would say that's too expensive. One top of that in my opinion exceptions should only be used for really exceptional things. –  AlexS Feb 18 '12 at 13:06
    
Well, if it is too expensive then there is an easy solution. Validate the structure with a regex first and then parse it with the appropriate DateTimeFormatter. Also, my solution is just as expensive as the accepted solution but using Jodatime as requested, not the standard JDK SimpleDateFormat. –  Johannes Feb 18 '12 at 14:35
    
True. It wasn't my intention to criticise your solution. I thought I should annotate it for others reading this question. I think the solution to this problem depends on personal preference. In my oppinion your answer fits better to this exact question than the accepted one... –  AlexS Feb 18 '12 at 15:01
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IMHO you are approaching the problem from the wrong perspective, if you have an input which consist on a list of Strings that represent dates, but in different formats, then you have a text validation problem, not a date formatting problem.

Again, this is only my opinion, but I think you'll find it easier if what you do is create a text parser that changes the text for all this inputs when necessary to a more suitable text format for your date parser, this way you can use more powerful utilities like regex...

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+1 because validating input is always a good idea! –  AlexS Feb 17 '12 at 10:53
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If you don't want to use any reference to java.util.Data, you'll have to do it like this:

public DateTime getDateTime(String text) {
    DateTimeFormatterBuilder fb = new DateTimeFormatterBuilder();
    fb.appendDayOfMonth(2);
    fb.appendLiteral('.');
    fb.appendMonthOfYear(2);
    fb.appendLiteral('.');
    fb.appendYear(2, 4);
    DateTimeFormatter formatter = fb.toFormatter();

    DateTime dt = formatter.parseDateTime(text);
    if (dt.getYear() < 2000) {
        dt = dt.plusYear(2000);
    }
    return dt;
}

But I would recommend this solution:

public DateTime getDateTime(String text) {
    SimpleDateFormat f = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yy");
    java.util.Date jud = f.parse(text);
    if (jud != null) {
        return new DateTime(jud);
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}

Both should do the trick and work for your examples.

Note: As Alberto said, you should validate your input first using regular expressions, because SimpleDateFormat doesn't have a very tight matching with this usage and because it's always a good idea to validate input.

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That's a very cool and simple solution. –  codevour Feb 17 '12 at 10:26
    
I think one shouldn't start inventing the wheel twice ;) (If that's the right proverb in english...) –  AlexS Feb 17 '12 at 10:40
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