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I'm creating a WSDL-first WS, and before I can create the WSDL, I'm hand-crafting the Schema. The is the first time I'm creating an XSD and WSDL from scratch, so please excuse my ignorance/bad practices. The client will be .NET, and server Java.

I am first creating two webservices: One to list all classes, and one to retrieve a class, and all students in that class.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" elementFormDefault="qualified" attributeFormDefault="unqualified">
    <xs:element name="classList">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:sequence>
                <xs:element name="class" type="Class" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
            </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
    <xs:element name="class">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:sequence>
                <xs:element name="class" type="Class"/>
            </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
    <xs:complexType name="Class">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="name" type="xs:string"/>
            <xs:element name="id" type="xs:int"/>
            <xs:element name="students" type="StudentList" minOccurs="0"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:complexType name="StudentList">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="student" type="Student" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:complexType name="Student">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="name" type="xs:string"/>
            <xs:element name="address" type="xs:string"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
</xs:schema>

Does the above schema make sense? If I generate some sample, I get the following for element classList:

<classList>
    <class>
        <name>String</name>
        <id>0</id>
    </class>
    <class>
        <name>String</name>
        <id>0</id>
    </class>
</classList>

I can choose to add students to classList, if I want. But this probably won't be done. And this for element class:

<class>
    <class>
        <name>String</name>
        <id>0</id>
        <students>
            <student>
                <name>String</name>
                <address>String</address>
            </student>
            <student>
                <name>String</name>
                <address>String</address>
            </student>
        </students>
    </class>
</class>

I'm not all that happy with the class/class naming. Since I'm designing for WSDL, should the element be something like classListResponse and classResponse?

Is it good practice that I create my entities as complexTypes, not as elements? And then create a container element to hold those entities?

share|improve this question

Some aspects of your question touch on stylistic issues, which by definition is main ingredient of steaming discussions... One way is to form a personal opinion, by looking up other messaging standards that may (or may not) relate to your domain of modeling. In my world, people use Rq/Rs, or Request/Response as suffixes to elements that'll show as root, or under the SOAP:Body element. There are other standards that for request have no suffix (e.g. Operation), and use "Response" suffix only (OperationResponse) for response elements.

As for the authoring style for XSDs, please look at articles such as this one. For WSDL style, WS-I is the reference book.

If your schema body is not that large, and makes no use of advanced features, then I would stick with a Venetian Blind-style, where all types are global and only the elements that need to be referenced from the WSDL message parts are global (input/output and faults). Use element references in your WSDL, document/literal. This should guarantee you smooth sailing.

If you build "data" services, one more thing I would consider, is to come up with a set of nouns (your entities) that describe your domain, and with a set of "verb" for intended actions (some start with basic CRUD, then add anything else specific to your domain, e.g. Cancel could be one...); Then your top level element tag names are assembled consistently using Noun + Verb + Suffix (Rq/Rs).

Regardless, always invest in setting up a simple-as-needed naming convention, it'll help in your modelling a lot!...

share|improve this answer
    
It's been a long week, and that is all flying way over my head. I'll have to read through that on Monday. Thank you for the response. To everyone else: Please, no flame wars. – Nicolas Feb 17 '12 at 13:31

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