Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my lecture of Design and Analysis of Algorithms the instructor said the for loop will take less time then while loop for the following sample algo.

1.  for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {    
2.      print(i);    
    }

1.  int i=0;
2.  while(i<5)
    {    
3.      print(i);    
4.      i++;    
    }

He said that the compiler will read the 1. of for while 5 times line 2. 4 times thus total time 5+4=9 But in the case of while loop. The compiler will read the 1. for 1 time,2. for 5 time, 3 for 4time and 4. for 4 time. Thus total time 1+5+4+4 = 14time Please tell me is this right. Is for loop is faster than while loop?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
A compiler set to opmizing for speed might just emit print(i) five times and eliminate the loop altogether. In both cases. –  Joey Feb 17 '12 at 10:58
    
In the real world we look at legibility of the code and pick either for or while depending on that. The compiler will either optimize the difference out. Or the difference is so small on modern machines that it is negligible. Use the one that makes your life easier, not the "life" of the computer. –  Bazzz Feb 17 '12 at 10:59
4  
i'm pretty sure the compiler will read each line just once ;) –  soulcheck Feb 17 '12 at 11:01
1  
The compiler will definetly read each line only once. Since it's basically the same set of instuctions ether way, it should make no difference at runtime. Strange instuctor though. –  Mithrandir Feb 17 '12 at 11:03
1  
@wali the problem is in your problem description. it's not about what will compiler read and how many times, it's the code it will generate. In this case it will probably be the same set of instructions with any modern compiler, with the exception that in second case you're not declaring the variable. –  soulcheck Feb 17 '12 at 11:06

3 Answers 3

At least with MSVC 16 (VS 2010) the code is pretty much the same in both cases:

for

; Line 5
    xor esi, esi
$LL3@main:
; Line 6
    push    esi
    push    OFFSET ??_C@_03PMGGPEJJ@?$CFd?6?$AA@
    call    _printf
    inc esi
    add esp, 8
    cmp esi, 5
    jl  SHORT $LL3@main

while

; Line 4
    xor esi, esi
$LL2@main:
; Line 6
    push    esi
    push    OFFSET ??_C@_03PMGGPEJJ@?$CFd?6?$AA@
    call    _printf
; Line 7
    inc esi
    add esp, 8
    cmp esi, 5
    jl  SHORT $LL2@main

Code in my Subversion repository.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for sanity. (note that only the debug information and label names are different) –  Matthieu M. Feb 17 '12 at 12:13
    
Check this link for reference knowledge-cess.com/for-loop-vs-while-loop-which-is-faster –  Sadanand Jul 23 at 14:45

In all the modern compilers loop analysis is done on a lower level intermediate representation (i.e., when all the high level loop constructs are expanded into labels and jumps). For a compiler both loops are absolutely equivalent.

share|improve this answer
    
what logical reason or proof i can provide to argue with him. –  wali Feb 17 '12 at 11:17
    
@wali, show him the assembly output for both versions, give this slides, show a relevant transform implementation in either gcc or llvm (which are quite typical representatives of the modern compilers). –  SK-logic Feb 17 '12 at 11:22

I'll pass on performance (hint: no difference, check the generated IR or assembly for proof) however there are two important differences in syntax and maintenance.

Syntax

The scope of the i variable is different. In the for case, the i is only accessible within the for header and body, while in the while case it is available after the loop. As a general rule, it's better to have tighter scopes, less variables in-flight mean less context to worry about when coding.

Maintenance

The for loop has the neat advantage of grouping all the iterations operations close together, so they can be inspected in one shot and so checked.

Also, there is one important difference when introducing continue statements:

for(int i = 0; i != 10; ++i) {
  if (array[i] == nullptr) { continue; }
  // act on it
}


int i = 0;
while (i != 10) {
  if (array[i] == nullptr) { continue; }
  // act on it
  ++i;
}

In the while case, the introduction of continue has created a bug: an infinite loop, as the counter is no longer implemented.

Impact

for loops are more readable and all-around better for regular iteration patterns. Even better, in C++11 the range-for statement:

for (Item const& item : collection) {
}

where iteration is entirely taken care of by the compiler, so you are sure not to mess up! (it makes the for_each algorithm somewhat moot... and we can wish the older for form starts retreating)

By corrolary: while loops should be reserved to irregular iteration patterns, this way they will attract special care during code review and from future maintainer by highlighting the irregularity of the case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.