Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it necessary to specify f while initiating a float type variable.

float a =3455.67f;

If I declare and initiate it as

float a = 3455.67;

Then what will happen?

share|improve this question
7  
Did you try it? –  samn Feb 17 '12 at 11:09
1  
@samm yes otherwise compiler gives error "Literal of type double cannot be implicitly converted to type 'float'; use an 'F' suffix to create a literal of this type". –  paulvaluthy Feb 17 '12 at 11:11
3  
The question should be re-written as "why is the F mandatory" rather than "what will happen" –  Mehdi LAMRANI Feb 17 '12 at 11:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The documentation on float says:

By default, a real numeric literal on the right side of the assignment operator is treated as double. Therefore, to initialize a float variable, use the suffix f or F.

This means that if you do float a = 3455.67; then the compiler will refuse to implicitly convert the double to a float.

share|improve this answer
    
I always wondered why was this a mandatory syntax. Apparently what really happens in the compiler level is that the right side of the equal operation is first assigned as double, before being assigned to the left had type. This sounds weird, as the F makes the explicit left "float" typing contingent –  Mehdi LAMRANI Feb 17 '12 at 11:34
    
More interesting documentation, this is required because double does not implicitly cast to float (or interestingly enough, anything else). See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y5b434w4.aspx –  BradleyDotNET May 30 at 19:13

By default, a real numeric literal on the right side of the assignment operator is treated as double. Therefore, to initialize a float variable, use the suffix f or F, as in the following example:

float x = 3.5F;

If you do not use the suffix in the previous declaration, you will get a compilation error because you are trying to store a double value into a float variable.

for more details look at msdn

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Copy/pasting from MSDN without further ado isn't really the way to go. –  Jon Feb 17 '12 at 11:14
    
yes I know but better to give some info here that put on only the URL link to msdn link after some time can be broken –  Serghei Feb 17 '12 at 11:23

This :

float a = 3455.67;

will not compile. 3455.67 is a double constant and C# will permit you to assign this value to a float variable.

Use:

float f = (float)3455.67;

or you will have to specify the "f" format suffix.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is float to double conversion considered widening, while double to float isn't? Logically, the reverse should be true, since e.g. (float)((double)0.1) and (float)((double)1E38*10.0) will yield (float)0.1 and (float)+INF [meaning something greater than 3.4E38], both of which are correct. By contrast, (double)(0.1f) or (double)((float)1E38f*10.0f) will yield (double)0.10000000149011612 and (double)+INF [meaning something greater than 1.79E308], both of which are wrong. Casts from more specific classes to less specific are widening, while reverse casts are narrowing. Why are floats backward? –  supercat Mar 20 '12 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.